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susancook
06-29-2012, 10:53 PM
I have never had scoliosis surgery. My pain is in my lumbar area on the Right [the concave area of my scoliosis]. It is intense burning pain all along my side [lateral area]. Why is the pain burning? That just seems strange. I could understand it if it was a pulling feeling, but it is a burning sensation. Thoughts?
Susan

Lorraine 1966
06-30-2012, 02:47 AM
Could be inflammation Susan which can feel a little like that. Just a thought if it continues I would get a doctor's advice. All the best,


Lorraine

rohrer01
06-30-2012, 03:21 AM
Could it be a pinched nerve? I've had all sorts of weird pains with my scoliosis. It could also be the onset of Shingles. Have you checked your skin? I would definitely go back to the doctor if it continues. I hope it goes away and you feel better!

susancook
06-30-2012, 04:45 AM
Could it be a pinched nerve? I've had all sorts of weird pains with my scoliosis. It could also be the onset of Shingles. Have you checked your skin? I would definitely go back to the doctor if it continues. I hope it goes away and you feel better!

Thanks! No shingles....I never thought to ask other people to describe their pain, but mine has always been a burning pain. Just seems strange to me.
Susan

SpineTime
06-30-2012, 07:33 PM
I have never had scoliosis surgery. My pain is in my lumbar area on the Right [the concave area of my scoliosis]. It is intense burning pain all along my side [lateral area]. Why is the pain burning? That just seems strange. I could understand it if it was a pulling feeling, but it is a burning sensation. Thoughts?
Susan

Hi Susan,

I remember asking my dr. about this when my back starting hurting so much with standing or walking. She gave me some print outs to read. When muscles burn, it's because of a build up of lactic acid. It happens to people when they exercise/work out, but it also happens when muscles are injured from overuse, and I think that's what happens to us. Basically, it's the body's defense mechanism, trying to protect itself from injury. (The body is also trying to protect itself in that same way when we get muscle spasms, BTW.)

My pain is the same as yours, on the right side, because of my curve. I think our paraspinal muscles on the right side are constantly being overworked, just in trying to keep us upright and straight when we stand and walk, etc. And the "cure" for this burning muscle pain is to let those overworked muscles rest, which we can never really do because of the curve.

I sometimes wonder, if we were to ignore this pain (as if that's even possible!) and keep going, through the pain, would it get to the point where we would cause ourselves to have a stress fracture or other serious injury?

Lisa

susancook
07-01-2012, 04:27 AM
Hi Susan,

I remember asking my dr. about this when my back starting hurting so much with standing or walking. She gave me some print outs to read. When muscles burn, it's because of a build up of lactic acid. It happens to people when they exercise/work out, but it also happens when muscles are injured from overuse, and I think that's what happens to us. Basically, it's the body's defense mechanism, trying to protect itself from injury. (The body is also trying to protect itself in that same way when we get muscle spasms, BTW.)

My pain is the same as yours, on the right side, because of my curve. I think our paraspinal muscles on the right side are constantly being overworked, just in trying to keep us upright and straight when we stand and walk, etc. And the "cure" for this burning muscle pain is to let those overworked muscles rest, which we can never really do because of the curve.

I sometimes wonder, if we were to ignore this pain (as if that's even possible!) and keep going, through the pain, would it get to the point where we would cause ourselves to have a stress fracture or other serious injury?

Lisa
Thanks for the info on the buildup of lactic acid. I'm thinking that maybe the muscles could rest by bending to the Left? It's not that simple, I think. I was reading some info last night on the internet on why scoliosis causes pain.

The spine is strong enough to stand the pull of the muscles...it just would hurt more with time. So, the pull would not cause the spine to break. I have tried to "ignore the pain" and find that if I can really get relaxed and take some deep breaths it is a little bit less, but just a little bit.

Again, thanks for the insight. It also helps to know that someone else is feeling the same way as I do. Susan

Roxanne1979
07-01-2012, 06:56 PM
Hi Susan, I have a 87 degree thoracolumbar curve (was 116 prior to fusion, I have lost some correction over the years) The concave side (left) has burned off and on over the years. For myself I have discovered doing stretches on the left side alleviates the burning. I'm not sure how you'd stretch just one side of the lower back. For me the relief is immediate.
Roxanne

susancook
07-01-2012, 07:09 PM
Hi Susan, I have a 87 degree thoracolumbar curve (was 116 prior to fusion, I have lost some correction over the years) The concave side (left) has burned off and on over the years. For myself I have discovered doing stretches on the left side alleviates the burning. I'm not sure how you'd stretch just one side of the lower back. For me the relief is immediate.
Roxanne

Thanks. How exactly do you do the stretches? Like arm over your head and lean to the side and then straighten and repeat? I'll try that and see if it helps.
Susan

leahdragonfly
07-01-2012, 08:31 PM
Hi Susan,

I had an increasing amount of trouble with this type of burning pain similar to what you describe, prior to my original surgery. During the year prior to the surgery my lumbar curve increased from 30-35 degrees to 47 degrees, which may account for a lot of the pain. I found it helpful to lay on my side on the bed, with a pillow under the convex side of the curve, so it could hopefully stretch open some and it did feel good. I have an s-curve so I would do this both sides, laying across the pillow under the fulcrum of the curve if that makes sense.

Best of luck,

Roxanne1979
07-01-2012, 09:46 PM
No leaning, I don't twist or lean since I'm fused. I reach for the top of the door molding with my left hand, I'm 5' 4' and can just barely touch it. If I'm at work i just reach up against a wall. I don't think this would help the lumbar. But the pillow exercise that Leahdragonfly describes sounds like it would work for the lumbar. I also do the kneeling lumbar flexion exercise, but it really stretches the whole lumbar.
Hope you find some relief.
Roxanne

susancook
07-02-2012, 02:48 AM
Hi Susan,

I had an increasing amount of trouble with this type of burning pain similar to what you describe, prior to my original surgery. During the year prior to the surgery my lumbar curve increased from 30-35 degrees to 47 degrees, which may account for a lot of the pain. I found it helpful to lay on my side on the bed, with a pillow under the convex side of the curve, so it could hopefully stretch open some and it did feel good. I have an s-curve so I would do this both sides, laying across the pillow under the fulcrum of the curve if that makes sense.

Best of luck,

Thanks I will try that!

susancook
07-02-2012, 02:50 AM
No leaning, I don't twist or lean since I'm fused. I reach for the top of the door molding with my left hand, I'm 5' 4' and can just barely touch it. If I'm at work i just reach up against a wall. I don't think this would help the lumbar. But the pillow exercise that Leahdragonfly describes sounds like it would work for the lumbar. I also do the kneeling lumbar flexion exercise, but it really stretches the whole lumbar.
Hope you find some relief.
Roxanne

Sorry to be so dumb, but what is Kneeling lumbar flexion exercise? Susan

Roxanne1979
07-02-2012, 05:36 PM
I tried to find a picture and instructions on line, but I could not find one exactly like what i do. I kneel on the floor with my palms on the floor, then keeping my hands stationary i slide the trunk of my body backwards onto my heels. For me it's a gentle stretch on the lumbar. All of the instructions on line do it differently, so perhaps I'm not doing it correctly, but it works for me.
Roxanne

SpineTime
07-03-2012, 03:40 PM
One of my favorite ways to stretch is by using an exercise ball. In fact, this thread reminded me of it, so I just used it to stretch and thought "Why am I not doing this more often?!" I like to have the exercise ball underneath me, around the stomach/hip area, with my arms and legs out (almost like in a postion to do a push-up) then move my hips to the left, then to the right to stretch the back. It feels fantastic. I do have kind of small exercise ball, not one of the bigger ones, and I think it let's me stretch more than a bigger one would, but I don't know. The relief doesn't last, of course, but feels good while you do it.

titaniumed
07-04-2012, 03:01 AM
Susan

I have one of these and it really works well at stretching the lower spine. A great lumbar stretch!
http://www.a3bs.com/Body-Arch-Traction-Table-W15054,p_863_928_1034_12880.html

I used to lay on it prone and supine dead center, hanging both arms and legs. I didnít lay on this sideways, but you could.

I also used an exercise ball for many years....

Pelvic tilts are good to do....
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelvic_tilt


I donít have an answer on pre-fusion burning....only that its probably nerve related. I had the burning in my recovery, but it eventually went away. Felt like a really bad sunburn around my hips and made sleeping that much harder.

Ed

susancook
07-04-2012, 04:21 AM
One of my favorite ways to stretch is by using an exercise ball. In fact, this thread reminded me of it, so I just used it to stretch and thought "Why am I not doing this more often?!" I like to have the exercise ball underneath me, around the stomach/hip area, with my arms and legs out (almost like in a postion to do a push-up) then move my hips to the left, then to the right to stretch the back. It feels fantastic. I do have kind of small exercise ball, not one of the bigger ones, and I think it let's me stretch more than a bigger one would, but I don't know. The relief doesn't last, of course, but feels good while you do it.

Not quite sure how to do this, but I will try. Thanks!
Susan

susancook
07-13-2012, 04:18 AM
Thanks for the exercise suggestions!!!!
Susan

SpineTime
07-13-2012, 03:15 PM
Not quite sure how to do this, but I will try. Thanks!
Susan

I tried to find a video or picture to describe this stretch better, but I couldn't. It's just something I came up with on my own. I got the exercise ball for exercise purposes, but I see if you do a search online, there are also a lot of stretches that can be done with it too. I will have to try some of them!

If you go to this page: http://www.gofit.net/pro-stability-balls.php and scroll down near the bottom where it shows the exercise called "Reverse Hyperextension," the way I position my arms is like that, and the position of the ball is similar to that, but the ball is higher up, under my stomach/pelvis. Then my legs are straight out, with the tips of my toes touching the floor (or you could have the tops of your feet resting on the floor). I have my legs about shoulder-width apart, or more (just experiment to see what feels best). Then shift your hips to the right, then the left. You're sort of in a U-shape around the ball. I hope that makes sense!

By the way, I don't recommend ever doing that "Reverse Hyperextension" exercise, and I *especially* don't recommend doing the one shown there called "Back Hyperextension." OUCH! I've tried it in the past (more than once, cause I'm a slow learner, apparently LOL) and it always made my back hurt so bad the next day!