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golfnut
06-24-2012, 03:13 PM
After corresponding with Donna today and comparing notes on our tennis and golf games post-op, I tried to find a thread with this topic and couldn't find one. I think it would be encouraging to those of you who are in the pre-surgery mode or in the early recovery period to hear from some of us who have returned to activities, even if there are some limitations. I know our main goals with surgery are to reduce pain and stop progression, but we also hope to be able to return to activities that are part of our life, too. I hope to hear from water skiers, snow skiers (Ed & Jenee & others), swimmers, tennis players, dancers, golfers, bikers, kayakers, etc. If anyone has a video, that would be even better.

I'll start:
Tap Dancing: returned at 6 months, but avoided some impact steps until I was a year post-op
Golf: started chipping and putting at 6 months and taking full swings at a year-Now, at 3 months into the season & 1 1/2 years post-op, I feel like I'm only a few strokes higher than I was before my surgery. It's so much better than I had hoped!
Bike Riding: Returned to leisurely riding my bike at a year post-op

My signature has a picture of me tap dancing and a video of me hitting a golf ball on my first day of playing golf after surgery.

JanetS
07-02-2012, 09:40 AM
Hello everyone. I am a candidate for a T4 to sacrum fusion in the future and for the past 20 years have enjoyed showing my Vizslas in conformation and agility. Any other conformation and/or agility enthusiasts on the list? I was told I would not be able to run with such a long fusion, but was surprised to see a post about being able to return to tennis which would also require the ability to run. If so, perhaps agility might not be out of the question for me at some point?

Janet
57 y/o
53 degree left thoracolumbar scoliosis
27 degree right thoracic scolisis
36 degree fractional lumbosacral scoliosis
(Twin Cities Spine Clinic 2002)

LSKOCH5
07-02-2012, 10:08 AM
I know kids are more resilient & this is an adult thread, but... I noticed this post today after an incredible weekend at the beach w Jacob. His 6-mo post anniv is tomorrow, and he started surfing on a longboard yesterday, along w paddleboarding, kayaking & tennis over the past 2 weeks. No problems from any of that, but soreness standing in formation at marching band rehearsals for hours. Guess there's no way around that one.

walkingmom
07-02-2012, 03:15 PM
Hello everyone. I am a candidate for a T4 to sacrum fusion in the future and for the past 20 years have enjoyed showing my Vizslas in conformation and agility. Any other conformation and/or agility enthusiasts on the list? I was told I would not be able to run with such a long fusion, but was surprised to see a post about being able to return to tennis which would also require the ability to run. If so, perhaps agility might not be out of the question for me at some point?

Janet
57 y/o
53 degree left thoracolumbar scoliosis
27 degree right thoracic scolisis
36 degree fractional lumbosacral scoliosis
(Twin Cities Spine Clinic 2002)

Hi Janet,
I am the tennis player who has returned to playing now that I am beyond one-yr post op. I am fused to L3, not the sacrum, so that may be a factor with my ability to move as well as I do. I am still waiting for that time to make a video of me playing tennis. However, with this heat wave, I may have to wait a bit longer.
Donna

djkinkead
07-03-2012, 05:59 AM
Hi JanetS,

I am ten months post surgery and did take my youngest dog, Augie, to a fun match two weeks ago. At first I just walked around with him but towards the end did a few trotting steps. It was a bit jarring, but I decided I could do the short trotting sprints with a dog if I had REALLY good, shock obsorbing shoes. Did some research and it appears some running shoes are built specifically for obsorbing shock. So I bought a pair.

Why?

Because once I showed up at the fun match my Belgian friends eyes gleamed in the hopes of building majors at the shows this weekend. Yep, I am entered. Husband is going along just in case I need a stand (trot?) in.

I have decided I would not show, at least for the foreseable future, to show at an outdoor show because the grounds are always a bit lumpy.

I guess we'll see how this goes! Hopefully Augie will behave and not trip me! He is a handful.

Jenna.KB
07-03-2012, 09:11 AM
Hi JanetS,

I am ten months post surgery and did take my youngest dog, Augie, to a fun match two weeks ago. At first I just walked around with him but towards the end did a few trotting steps. It was a bit jarring, but I decided I could do the short trotting sprints with a dog if I had REALLY good, shock obsorbing shoes. Did some research and it appears some running shoes are built specifically for obsorbing shock. So I bought a pair.

Why?

Because once I showed up at the fun match my Belgian friends eyes gleamed in the hopes of building majors at the shows this weekend. Yep, I am entered. Husband is going along just in case I need a stand (trot?) in.

I have decided I would not show, at least for the foreseable future, to show at an outdoor show because the grounds are always a bit lumpy.

I guess we'll see how this goes! Hopefully Augie will behave and not trip me! He is a handful.

Hi

Not sure if I've said before but your before xray curves are very similar to my curves although mine is the opposite to yours and I have a harrington rod at the bottom.
I think my full fusion with possible pelvis fixation will be similar to yours too so its nice to know your starting to trot :-) already. I hope we're able to do more exercise as time does by post op.
Good Luck with your showing x

JenniferG
07-03-2012, 04:20 PM
The only restrictions I was given were no running and no lifting heavy objects. I can do both, without any problems, but I am not keen to risk a further surgery to extend my rods in the future, so avoid those activities. Physically, I don't think there's anything I *can't* do, just things that I deliberately avoid. (Small price to pay.) At 61 I still have a lot of living to do and further spinal surgery is something I can do without.

titaniumed
07-04-2012, 12:32 AM
Karen

Did you want me to post? I’m such a lurking turkey....

Since running seems to be the topic....I can run, but its not something I do unless my date is upset....There is no shock absorbing qualities left in my spine so, I guess the best way to put it is that it’s not a natural feeling anymore. Running on my toes helps absorb that shock.

I have lifted 150#. I know, its nuts but it happened. Sure did put it to the test huh? I have permission to lift 100#. Its not something I do often.

I bought a ski pass for next season. I did not have one for this past season because I’m able to predict snowfall....LOL and yes, it was a really bad snow season. Next season HAS to be better. My restrictions now with skiing are “no velocity” which result in a devastating crash. I was told that fusions can crack in a rotational direction, so a hard blow to the shoulders would not be good. I don’t ski extremely hard anymore....my body can’t handle it, and I’m not allowed to jump anymore....

Riding on a motorcycle is much easier now.....swimming and or diving is not a problem other than putting on fins, which can be a test. Looking down can present problems, I cannot attach a ski ticket to my waist, I cannot see, because I cannot bend my spine....a full fusion thing.

Welcome Janet,
While we can be agile, (in time, after we are recovered) things that shock us vertically, like running hard for a long distance, or landing from a jump are delicate. If I’m sitting on a wall, and have to hop down around 24” I will hesitate. That’s not going to feel all that pleasant. Good luck with your decision, keep posting and asking questions.

After 4 1/2 years, I consider my surgeries a complete success. I don’t think I could have come out any better. I never thought that I would be saying these words....

For the 1st time, I had someone measure my scars with a tape ruler. 22” back scar, 12” front scar. They are getting hard to see now...
Ed

golfnut
07-04-2012, 05:46 AM
Yes, Ed, I definitely hoped you would post. Can you put the link to your unbelievable talents on the slopes? No one would believe that it would be possible.

titaniumed
07-04-2012, 11:34 AM
Here it is, I’m in the red jacket. The video was done 01/01/11
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tEypv3Vz8o&feature=email

When you know how to ski properly, it doesn’t take much effort just like in the video. Just like any sport, technique is essential. If you want the workout, its there if you wish, if you don’t, it isn’t.

One of the things that I though was helpful for the thoracic after surgery is poling on the flats. Just like a cross country skier, the full motion of the arms with some resistance really toughened my paraspinal’s up again.

I used to ski bike years ago. I decided that I would give my bike to a friend since it is too dangerous. That is one activity with maximum “G” forces, the crashes are unforgiving and there are no brakes. This activity is too dangerous after fusion surgery. (smiley face)

Ed

golfnut
07-04-2012, 12:16 PM
Thanks, Ed! That video is way more exciting and inspirational than my first golf swing of 2012. I am still not where I was before surgery with consistency in my golf scores and with the distance of most clubs, but I've had several good scores that give me hope that it will come with practice, patience & working out.

walkingmom
07-04-2012, 01:47 PM
Hey everyone!

It seemed appropriate to make my tennis video on July 4th when it is hotter than a firecracker on the tennis courts! I have included my tennis videos in my signature. Granted, they won't be competing with any of the Wimbledon highlights. However, I am just thrilled to be playing again!

Donna

golfnut
07-04-2012, 02:48 PM
Donna,
That was just great! Your form looks good. I didn't even play golf today because of the heat, so I can't even imagine playing tennis! Thanks for sharing your video.

loves to skate
07-04-2012, 06:30 PM
I went back to roller skating 11 months post-op and really enjoyed it because I felt the joy of doing something that I thought I might never be able to do again. Since we have moved to N. Carolina, there is no skating for adults so now I am enjoying line dancing which is quite physical and great exercise. I am also starting Zumba classes and will only do what I can do. It is a lot of fun and excellent exercise.
Take care everyone.
Sally

golfnut
07-04-2012, 06:38 PM
What a shame there is no roller skating for adults. You look like a professional in your pictures. I'm sure you miss it.

loves to skate
07-05-2012, 10:36 AM
Yes i do, but life goes on. I miss my skating friends as much as I miss the skating.
Sally

JenniferG
07-05-2012, 04:25 PM
Wow Donna, you look like a natural in that video. Well done, at just over 1 year post op!

Sorry to hear you're unable to skate at your new home Sally, but you certainly sound like an active lady.

I went back to kayaking at about 7 months. Initially only for an hour at a time. I was surprised that shoulder and arm-strength wise, it hadn't changed much, but the tailbone gave me a bit of trouble that first time. I then used both a cushion and a seat-back and we can now travel for hours up and down our rivers and reservoirs. Heaven!

Kayaking was the one thing I was hoping I could continue because it's incredibly relaxing.

Irina
07-05-2012, 04:45 PM
Wow Donna, you look like a natural in that video. Well done, at just over 1 year post op!

Sorry to hear you're unable to skate at your new home Sally, but you certainly sound like an active lady.

I went back to kayaking at about 7 months. Initially only for an hour at a time. I was surprised that shoulder and arm-strength wise, it hadn't changed much, but the tailbone gave me a bit of trouble that first time. I then used both a cushion and a seat-back and we can now travel for hours up and down our rivers and reservoirs. Heaven!

Kayaking was the one thing I was hoping I could continue because it's incredibly relaxing.

Jennifer,

I'm so impressed that kayaking is possible with a fusion to pelvis. I thought that sitting on the floor (or very low) would be impossible. Btw, I took your advice about exercising to heart. We have a gym at work and I go there almost every day for 40-50 min either at lunch time or after work.

Pooka1
07-05-2012, 04:55 PM
Since we have moved to N. Carolina, there is no skating for adults

Adults can skate at locations in Raleigh. Here is one I have been to and I admit it seems geared towards kids...

http://www.skatejellybeans.com/jbHome.asp

This being south of the Mason-Dixon, they have Christian Music night once a month. They also offer Zumba out of the facility.

There is another one in Cary.

JenniferG
07-05-2012, 06:20 PM
Jennifer,

I'm so impressed that kayaking is possible with a fusion to pelvis. I thought that sitting on the floor (or very low) would be impossible. Btw, I took your advice about exercising to heart. We have a gym at work and I go there almost every day for 40-50 min either at lunch time or after work.

Hi Irina,

That's great news. I bet it's not long before you start to feel the benefits.

If I was to sit on the floor with my legs straight out in front of me, without support, I would find it difficult. I'd probably topple sideways. But having the seat back, which is just a bit of canvas strapped into position, makes all the difference.

JanetS
07-07-2012, 07:14 PM
I am ten months post surgery and did take my youngest dog, Augie, to a fun match two weeks ago. At first I just walked around with him but towards the end did a few trotting steps. It was a bit jarring, but I decided I could do the short trotting sprints with a dog if I had REALLY good, shock obsorbing shoes. Did some research and it appears some running shoes are built specifically for obsorbing shock. So I bought a pair.

Why?

Because once I showed up at the fun match my Belgian friends eyes gleamed in the hopes of building majors at the shows this weekend. Yep, I am entered. Husband is going along just in case I need a stand (trot?) in.

I have decided I would not show, at least for the foreseable future, to show at an outdoor show because the grounds are always a bit lumpy.

I guess we'll see how this goes! Hopefully Augie will behave and not trip me! He is a handful.[/QUOTE]
_______________
Congratulations on getting back into the ring! I'm sure your Belgian friends will be happy to see you as majors can be difficult to find. I hope your weekend of shows is successful! And thanks for posting--your comments are encouraging.

golfnut
07-08-2012, 02:48 PM
Good luck. Let us know how Auggie and you do.

leahdragonfly
07-08-2012, 08:26 PM
I used to show Pharaoh Hounds, and the comments about showing got me thinking...how would you manage stacking your dog? Would you have to kneel? It seems like for me anyway, bending over the height of a medium-sized dog for baiting and stacking would be difficult.

As far as Karen's original question, I was an active lap swimmer prior to surgery, and I have returned to it after both surgeries. I lost my flip turns due to inability to bend enough to comfortably flip, and I can no longer do dolphin kick, but I am fine with freestyle, backstroke and breaststroke. It always feels great to be in the water. I swim laps for 30-60 minutes about 4-5 days per week. I am now 5 months post-op major anterior/posterior revision for broken rods (which included an osteotomy), and I am still gaining back some stamina and strength for swimming. Getting back into active shape after being relatively inactive during recovery is a bitch!

djkinkead
07-12-2012, 09:06 PM
Well, I did survive showing Augie doggie, and because this was his first "real" show, he decided to sit for exam. Sigh. Belgians are a medium sized dog and so I basically had to get down on my knees, bring in the crane and lift the dog's back end to stand up and then stack him. Silly dog.

At almost 11 months I can kind of bend (from the hips), but if I need to really control the dog, it's down on my knees to do the ground work.

JanetS
07-12-2012, 11:16 PM
Well, I did survive showing Augie doggie, and because this was his first "real" show, he decided to sit for exam. Sigh. Belgians are a medium sized dog and so I basically had to get down on my knees, bring in the crane and lift the dog's back end to stand up and then stack him. Silly dog.

At almost 11 months I can kind of bend (from the hips), but if I need to really control the dog, it's down on my knees to do the ground work.

Congratulations on getting back in the ring with Augie!! Glad to hear you can bend from the hips or kneel to stack. How was gaiting him around the ring??

Janet

djkinkead
07-13-2012, 07:14 AM
Gaiting him took some experimentation. I first tried light normal running where you land on your heels--that jarred my back too much. I started trotting more on the balls of my feet and that went very well.

I will state that in the past 1.5 months I feel I have gained quite a bit of agility and kneeling down and getting back up without something to grab is getting easier--but it still takes a bit of "concentration".

I am happy that I am no longer winded running around the ring--I never realized how much wind capacity I was losing.

JanetS
07-13-2012, 10:10 AM
Gaiting him took some experimentation. I first tried light normal running where you land on your heels--that jarred my back too much. I started trotting more on the balls of my feet and that went very well.

I will state that in the past 1.5 months I feel I have gained quite a bit of agility and kneeling down and getting back up without something to grab is getting easier--but it still takes a bit of "concentration".

I am happy that I am no longer winded running around the ring--I never realized how much wind capacity I was losing.

I'm so happy to hear you were able to determine how to gait him well without impacting your back. Congratulations on your return to the ring. The information you've shared is very encouraging to me.

Janet

Doreen1
08-05-2012, 09:42 AM
Hi Karen,

This is an awesome thread; thanks for starting it. I celebrated 9 months postop by walking my first ever 5k race and finished in less than one hour! Since I've been advised to never jog again but was told to walk as much as possible as long as it doesn't hurt, I've been bit by the race walking bug. After exploring high quality walking shoes, I invested in a pair of Mizuno's and they are so comfortable! I'm planning several more 5k races over the next several months leading up to my big goal of the NYC Hope & Possibility 8k race in June 2013.

Warmly,
Doreen

golfnut
08-05-2012, 03:57 PM
Thanks for posting, Doreen.

Everyone: Be sure to click on Doreen's link to her race pictures. She looks so tall, slim, and in good physical condition (also very straight!!!)

KathK
08-05-2012, 10:03 PM
Hi All,

Doreen, congrats on your 5K! That’s fantastic and a great pace! FYI..the largest “walking only” race in the country is in Ohio! The walk offers a 10K and a half marathon course. We should get a group together and walk in it next fall!

www.newalbanywalkingclassic.com

I have never considered myself to be "athletic", but I have always enjoyed walking, hiking, and biking. My husband and I just returned from a trip to Banff, Jasper and Yoho National Parks in Canada. I was thrilled that I was able to handle our “Rocky Mountain” hikes! We took several hikes that had very steep sections and/or scree fields. See my signature for a link to a few hiking picture. My back was tired at the end of these hiking days, but so was the rest of my body. I did find trekking pole to be very helpful when descending. The Canadian Rockies are amazing!

Also, this trip was my 12th flight since my surgery 2 years ago and my longest flight to date. One leg of the flight was 3.5 hours. I had no problems!

LSKOCH5
08-06-2012, 11:52 AM
KathK - Look at that straight back & form! Thanks for sharing your gorgeous photos! Jasper has always been on our bucket list. Sometime. So great that you did so well with the rough trail hiking - the poles help tremendously. We were out hiking Rocky Mtn Natl Pk last month w Jacob, who was right at 6 mos post-op. Did great with all the hiking, scree fields, boulders & all.

Doreen1
08-13-2012, 05:34 PM
Hi All,

Doreen, congrats on your 5K! That’s fantastic and a great pace! FYI..the largest “walking only” race in the country is in Ohio! The walk offers a 10K and a half marathon course. We should get a group together and walk in it next fall!

www.newalbanywalkingclassic.com

I have never considered myself to be "athletic", but I have always enjoyed walking, hiking, and biking. My husband and I just returned from a trip to Banff, Jasper and Yoho National Parks in Canada. I was thrilled that I was able to handle our “Rocky Mountain” hikes! We took several hikes that had very steep sections and/or scree fields. See my signature for a link to a few hiking picture. My back was tired at the end of these hiking days, but so was the rest of my body. I did find trekking pole to be very helpful when descending. The Canadian Rockies are amazing!

Also, this trip was my 12th flight since my surgery 2 years ago and my longest flight to date. One leg of the flight was 3.5 hours. I had no problems!

Count me in for the 10k in 2013!!! Have you walked the Walking Classic before? The Canadian Rocky pix are breathtaking! What month did you visit there?

Warmly,
Doreen

Doreen1
08-13-2012, 05:39 PM
Hi Janet,
I am the tennis player who has returned to playing now that I am beyond one-yr post op. I am fused to L3, not the sacrum, so that may be a factor with my ability to move as well as I do. I am still waiting for that time to make a video of me playing tennis. However, with this heat wave, I may have to wait a bit longer.
Donna

LOVE, LOVE the video, Donna!

Warmly,
Doreen

KathK
08-17-2012, 04:03 PM
LSKOCH- Sounds like Jacob did great at Rocky Mtn National Park! If I can hike at 2 years post-op close to what he can hike at 6 months post-op, I'll take it! (smiles)

Doreen, Yes, I did the 10K walk in 2009 in preparation for my 2010 surgery. I used to be a fast walker, but have not yet regained my pre-surgery walking pace. Pre-surgery, I would routinely walk 4 miles per hour. Now, I'm usually between 3.2 and 3.5 miles per hour (after 2 years). It sounds like your pace is excellent for only being 9 months post-op. The club that you joined, Archilles International, sounds really great. Wonderful to have support in your training. I will be cheering for you in your upcoming walks! Look forward to seeing your posts!

Kathy

golfnut
09-17-2012, 09:39 PM
After not playing golf for 15 months, I am happy to tell my scoli friends that I won the 36 hole Ladies' Club Championship this past weekend at the Waterloo Country Club. I have won it 24 times previously, but this win was by far the best since I really didn't think it would be possible after being fused from T4 to the sacrum and adjusting to a different swing. Please know that the purpose of this post is not to boast but to give hope to others that they can return to many athletic activities after surgery.

walkingmom
09-17-2012, 10:55 PM
Karen,
Congratulations on your victory! I am thrilled for you that you have returned to your sport with such success. I am currently awaiting word on my own medical appeal that I submitted to the USTA in hopes that they will lower my player rating so that I can play at a level that matches up with my flexibility, or lack thereof. My appeal was fairly straightforward .... I explained my surgery and then said "See attached X-ray.". I think that picture speaks volumes for any of us who have had the surgery.

Thanks for sharing your victory news! It really is inspiring for all of us.

Donna

jrnyc
09-17-2012, 11:46 PM
congratulations, Karen...
quite an accomplishment...
would not have occurred to me that it would
be possible to have a good golf swing after being
fused to sacrum!
i know you said your post isn't to brag, and it is to
encourage others to know returning to athletics
is do-able...but i think some bragging is in order!!

just wondering how much adjusting of your swing
was required, and how much practicing was needed...
did you need to change to different length clubs, or change
your putter....???

again, congratulations....

jess...& Sparky

golfnut
09-18-2012, 07:47 PM
Jess,
Prior to playing this spring, I really could not imagine that it would even be possible to make a good pivot and follow through. It has been so much better than I expected, even though I've lost a little distance with my clubs. The hardest change was being forced to turn more in one piece instead of twisting. I had to really work hard on the timing in order to hit the ball solidly and straight. I have a video of one of my first swings in a round of golf in Florida in my signature, but feel like I'm hitting it much better than that now after playing all summer. I hope to keep improving next year.

JenniferG
09-18-2012, 09:51 PM
Congratulations Karen. It's a testament to your surgeon's amazing skills that, with a mass of hardware in your back, you are able to return to golf - and win!

jrnyc
09-18-2012, 10:22 PM
thanks, Karen...
great video...
amazing...that you could swing like that early on....
congratulations for getting back in the game....

jess...& Sparky

LSKOCH5
09-19-2012, 10:55 AM
After not playing golf for 15 months, I am happy to tell my scoli friends that I won the 36 hole Ladies' Club Championship this past weekend at the Waterloo Country Club. I have won it 24 times previously, but this win was by far the best since I really didn't think it would be possible after being fused from T4 to the sacrum and adjusting to a different swing. Please know that the purpose of this post is not to boast but to give hope to others that they can return to many athletic activities after surgery.

Congratulations, Karen! That is phenomenal. Thank God for this wonderful surgery & continued healing which has allowed you & so many to get back to their lives. So very happy for you!

KathK
09-20-2012, 07:57 PM
Karen,

Congratulations! You must be an incredible golfer! You have won this championship 24 times previously?!?! And, then you came back 1 year after a huge fusion surgery to win again! I can't get over it! I just keep smiling thinking about it! My hat is off to you!

Kathy

Confusedmom
09-20-2012, 08:46 PM
That's fantastic, Karen!!!! Love to hear scoli success stories!!! You need to hook up with that young pro golfer who is fused.

Best,
Evelyn

golfnut
09-20-2012, 09:01 PM
Her name is Stacy Lewis. I followed her when she played in a tournament in Springfield, IL last year and always check her scores for every tournament. She won two tournaments this year and will most likely be the "player of the year" & has made over 1/2 million this year. She has a short fusion and has a lot of flexibility, which allows her to hit a long ball. As a child, she had to wear a brace 24 hours a day for 7 years and only took it off to play golf before she had surgery. She is the celebrity spokesperson for SRS.

titaniumed
09-22-2012, 08:03 PM
Karen

I knew you wanted some pics of my trip hiking in Utah, so here are some of them. I’m posting from Bryce Canyon NP, they have internet here! Ive been using a motorcycle to get around, I hang it on the back of the RV. I also met with Nan in Park City, it was a great visit!

They have great bird watching out here! lol

More to come, I'm not done and the best is yet to come.

Ed

mabeckoff
09-22-2012, 08:33 PM
Karen

I knew you wanted some pics of my trip hiking in Utah, so here are some of them. I’m posting from Bryce Canyon NP, they have internet here! Ive been using a motorcycle to get around, I hang it on the back of the RV. I also met with Nan in Park City, it was a great visit!

They have great bird watching out here! lol

More to come, I'm not done and the best is yet to come.

Ed

Ed, You are a inspiration to me .I hope that someday I will be able to visit these parks.
Melissa

titaniumed
09-23-2012, 11:17 AM
Ed, You are a inspiration to me .I hope that someday I will be able to visit these parks.
Melissa

I’m glad to post these sorts of things....put it on your list. It’s a shame to grow up in the US and not visit our National Parks. People travel from all over the world to visit special places like these. In a nutshell, it’s the “Edward Abbey” coming out in me, even if only a few weeks a year....

These are great places to reflect, breathe deep, and think about things. Even if hiking involves pain, you can easily mask this, and push your thoughts past. It is something that’s of great value in surgical recovery, something I know I needed to do and still do.

These are healing wonderlands. Natures rehabilitation hospitals.

Well, its time for more re-hab. Gotta go. (smiley face)
Ed

mabeckoff
09-23-2012, 11:29 AM
I’m glad to post these sorts of things....put it on your list. It’s a shame to grow up in the US and not visit our National Parks. People travel from all over the world to visit special places like these. In a nutshell, it’s the “Edward Abbey” coming out in me, even if only a few weeks a year....

These are great places to reflect, breathe deep, and think about things. Even if hiking involves pain, you can easily mask this, and push your thoughts past. It is something that’s of great value in surgical recovery, something I know I needed to do and still do.

These are healing wonderlands. Natures rehabilitation hospitals.

Well, its time for more re-hab. Gotta go. (smiley face)
Ed


I have been to several National Parks in the West; such as Bryce,Zion, Grand Canyon, Canyon lands, Mount Rushmore. On the East Coast, I have been to some as well, such as Shenandoah, Smoky Mts, Seashore .

I just don't know if I will ever get to seeing the new ones so close to where I live now. I am in either in pain or so tired from the fibro that I can't get out of bed. Such is my life, I guess

titaniumed
09-23-2012, 06:04 PM
I just don't know if I will ever get to seeing the new ones so close to where I live now. I am in either in pain or so tired from the fibro that I can't get out of bed. Such is my life, I guess

You will someday, count on it. With the amount of surgeries that you have had, I’m not surprised that you are tired. I battled fatigue for 2 years after my scoli, arm, and gall bladder surgeries. The body is extremely complex and sensitive to any and everything.

There has to be a point when your surgical intervention will cease. Only after this happens, and you fully heal, we will expect a Yosemite or Redwoods report from you!

Here are todays pics from Bryce Cyn. This is wall street from the top and bottom, and me in the middle.
Ed

golfnut
09-23-2012, 08:44 PM
Thanks, Ed. The pictures are beautiful.

titaniumed
09-25-2012, 10:34 PM
Another trip report.
Just came back from a little stroll in the park. Zion National park has this trail.....its called Angel’s landing.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angels_Landing


I did this hike with 40# on my back and its pretty much straight up all the way. The trail at one point has 1400 foot sheer walls on each side so balance is truly needed. No mistakes allowed on this one folks. The pics will explain quite a bit...it was freaky high. Higher than the World Trade Center.

Possible with a full fusion? You betcha!

Ed

titaniumed
09-25-2012, 10:36 PM
Almost forgot.

golfnut
09-26-2012, 10:40 AM
These pictures are amazing. You have to be in great shape and a bit of a daredevil, as well!

Irina
09-26-2012, 01:03 PM
These pictures are stunning. Thank you, Ed, for sharing.

Doreen1
12-05-2012, 12:35 PM
Hi Karen,

Thank you for asking me to share my new sport story here. My daughter has been shooting archery for 2.5 years and started competing this year. Over the years, her coaches have encouraged me to shoot too, but I was always declined because of being in too much pain preop. It hit me at one of my daughter's recent tourneys, "Hmmm, I wonder if I can do this?" After speaking with Dr. Lenke and his PT they cleared me to do archery only if I train with someone who is aware of my limitations and if I do exactly what a coach teaching me. I've never done archery in my life, until now. :)

My daughter's coach has never trained anyone with a disability. I learned through the grapevine that there is a local female Paralympic archer, Lee Ford, who happens to train with a coach in the town next to me! I met with Lee's coach to determine if I had the physical capabilities to hold a bow and draw the string. He explained that he normally only works with athletes who are heading to the Olympics/Paralympics but he is willing to train me for competitions after I learn the basics with my daughter's coach (both coaches know each other very well). My daughter's coach is extremely helpful and is always reminding me to stop if I get too tired.

I'm shooting a recurve bow with a super light draw weight of #15. Since it is my goal to compete as a disabled archer, I need to work my way up to a 40# draw weight on a compound bow. It has been such an incredible experience having a team of people helping me learn something new! In the process, I hope to rebuild the muscle that atrophied between my shoulder blades.

Here is a pic of my first archery lesson. http://bit.ly/SNiJdW I actually shot three arrows in the gold and won a little contest the class was having.

Warmly,
Doreen

LSKOCH5
12-28-2012, 09:25 AM
Hey Karen & Ed -
Just got back from Steamboat for Christmas - Dr Cronen approved Jacob to ski, so that was what we did for Christmas/birthday presents! Started on greens, then were back into blues w no prob. Altogether he did amazingly well - tho he absolutely scared 10 years off my life - he accidentally caught 5+ feet of air & landed on his back. Amazingly he shook it off & was ok - thank God. Scary stuff, but shows how strong the fused back is. Also survived & thrived marching band season as 1st Bass, hopefully center snare next year, then quads. Hope you're both doing exceptionally well - thanks for all your support!

golfnut
12-28-2012, 07:53 PM
Way to go, Jacob! I can't imagine how terrified you were when he fell on his back. I'm glad he's doing so well!

titaniumed
12-28-2012, 08:21 PM
Steamboat! Been there.....Champagne powder, Aspen trees, and the St Patty’s day bash...(A thing of the past, the town couldn’t handle it anymore.......he he)

The stunt he pulled is called a “ruptured duck”. It happens to the best of us, I did one that was 75 feet once at A-Basin, and I’m still here! When you are there, you do come to the conclusion that you are completely out of control.....its a reality check, and the brain kicks in with thoughts of how to deal with the embarrassment of the situation. (smiley face) For Jacob, this was the main thought, not the back.

I’m sure he loved going skiing, a needed break from all he went through with the surgery and all.

How is he doing with the back anyway? I could imagine he is doing quite well.....

Ed

LSKOCH5
12-30-2012, 12:20 PM
So you're the crazy guy they were all talking about at Slopeside -JK! You are quite an inspiration & I've loved seeing your pics & reading your adventures. We live for exploring & hiking this gorgeous nation of ours! Turns out that the bottom of one of Jacob's rods is no longer attached to the screw, so we go back in 4 months to make sure no further movement. Fairly certain it was that "duck" but could have been another time he tripped & fell on an instrument. No pain down there so it's w positive expectations of he's fused already & doesn't need the rod there, w youth on his side. Jacob was completely freaked out about it but is on board w dr & us now. Thanks for asking, Happy New Year & keep up the photos! Congrats to Doreen on your new skills & sport as well! And Karen - how's the golfing?

golfnut
12-30-2012, 03:48 PM
LeighAnn,
The golf game is better than I ever expected, but on hold now due to snow on the ground. I played a couple of times earlier in December. John and I were laughing the other day. When I got permission to take a full swing after my 1 year check up last January, we had a morning of freezing rain. As soon as it stopped, I went outside in about 25 degree weather and put some balls on the frozen blades of grass and practiced hitting across the street just to see if it was possible to turn and make contact with the ball. As you can tell, my user name is appropriate.
Let me know what the Dr. says about the loose screw.

thatrobyno
01-03-2013, 07:30 PM
I've really enjoyed reading everyone's inspiring responses. I'm athletic and love the outdoors. It's nice to know if I go the surgical route that I can still climb up rocks.

We just returned from London and my husband and I climbed to the top of St. Paul's Cathedral -- 528 very steep narrow steps, 85 meters straight up! On the climb up, I couldn't stop wondering if I could do it post-surgery. I think one of the only problems would be some of the very low ceilings where I had to duck and squeeze through a small space at the same time.

Does anyone ride a bike? (Conventional, not recumbent). I commute via bicycle in the city and would love to continue.

Thanks!

golfnut
01-03-2013, 07:47 PM
I am riding my bike again, but I am a little more cautious with speed than I was before surgery. I tried at about 6 months and a squirrel ran right in front of my bike and it scared me, so I decided to wait until I was a year post-op.

susancook
01-03-2013, 07:55 PM
Steamboat! Been there.....Champagne powder, Aspen trees, and the St Patty’s day bash...(A thing of the past, the town couldn’t handle it anymore.......he he)

The stunt he pulled is called a “ruptured duck”. It happens to the best of us, I did one that was 75 feet once at A-Basin, and I’m still here! When you are there, you do come to the conclusion that you are completely out of control.....its a reality check, and the brain kicks in with thoughts of how to deal with the embarrassment of the situation. (smiley face) For Jacob, this was the main thought, not the back.

I’m sure he loved going skiing, a needed break from all he went through with the surgery and all.

How is he doing with the back anyway? I could imagine he is doing quite well.....

Ed
Whatever you have in your back, I want some. I asked Dr. HART about backpacking postop and he said "probably not". Maybe I should not have asked. Susan

thatrobyno
01-03-2013, 08:01 PM
I am riding my bike again, but I am a little more cautious with speed than I was before surgery. I tried at about 6 months and a squirrel ran right in front of my bike and it scared me, so I decided to wait until I was a year post-op.

Ah! Good news! (And I hope from now on, your rides are in squirrel-free zones)

titaniumed
01-03-2013, 09:57 PM
Whatever you have in your back, I want some. I asked Dr. HART about backpacking postop and he said "probably not". Maybe I should not have asked. Susan

Susan

Its not what’s in the back, its what’s in the mind.....

Having a strong determination to heal and succeed is what its all about. If one of my legs didn’t work, I would climb on crutches.

Major surgery is the acid test in goal setting....we all reach our goals at some point, no matter what mountains we have to climb.

I had no promises before my surgeries....and no pretty picture was painted.....maybe that was done to keep expectations lower.

I must say, it worked like a charm.....

Ed

JenniferG
01-03-2013, 11:08 PM
Susan, your back will be stronger than ever before.

My partner, 70 in September, gave notice of his retirement today. He was late for work this morning, for the first time in the 21 years we've been together and he said he'd been looking for a sign and decided that was it. He finishes February 1st. So we have loads of time ahead to enjoy doing anything we want with my new back and his new ankle and foot (yes, we are both full of titanium.) More kayaking, more hiking, more swimming and snorkeling. Thank goodness for amazing surgeons! And being fortunate enough to be born in a part of the world where these surgeries are possible.

golfnut
06-10-2013, 10:32 AM
Much to my surprise, I was able to hoola hoop today in exercise class. It was the first time the instructor has used them and I had not tried it since my surgery.
I realize this isn't an "athletic activity" as I put in the thread title, but thought I'd mention it anyway.

golfnut
01-10-2014, 06:10 PM
I know it has been a while since this thread surfaced so I thought I'd "bump" it, for the benefit of new forum members. I remember months before my surgery and during the early recovery period that I wondered if I would EVER return to a normal, active life. Fortunately, I've returned to all of my pre-surgery activities as did so many others who posted previously on this thread. I hope this is helpful.

the_baroness
04-18-2014, 01:34 PM
Unless you count walking up the hill in Park Slope, Brooklyn to get to my physical therapist's office. Well, I am a combination inspired and dismayed to hear of everyone's athletic accomplishments. As of this week, I am 10 months post op, and I don't feel as if I've come as far as some of you. I had a real set-back in December and January, and spent those months doing a lot of pain relief activities and stretching in PT, instead of strengthening. It's been slow-going. I had no idea it would take this long to recover. Dr. Errico made it sound like I would bounce back by 6 months, but I think I'm more than a few months behind schedule.

In the last month I have started to increase my ab-strengthening, and I started swimming. Ok, I tried it once. Swimming so far hasn't been very successful. I found it very painful to kick, and to turn my body to come out of the water when taking a breath. My endurance and stamina are really low as well. After 10 minutes, I was so exhausted I got out and went home, and fell into such a deep sleep I felt like someone had clonked me over the head! I've had better luck water-walking in the pool, but my PT really wants me to step it up and start swimming.

I spent so many months just dealing with the pain and stiffness (my legs and arms were sort of "locked-in" for a while), that it's only recently we've been able to focus on strengthening. But you've gotta start somewhere, I guess. I have also reinstated my gym membership. I was going to PT 3x a week, and working full time, but from Nov (when I went back to work) through Feb/Mar, it was all I could do to make it to and from work and PT. On the weekends I would do some light chores in the mornings, then collapse into bed for the afternoon and evening. At night after work I would just come home and collapse into bed. But I had a deal with my PT that when I was strong enough to make it to the gym on a Saturday in order to talk to the front office about reinstating my membership, that's when she would give me the go-ahead to drop down to PT only 2x a week. And as much as I love my PT, that was incentive because I feel like I spend more time with my PT than I do with my husband! So I finally mustered up myself and reinstated my membership, and now I go and ride the recumbent bike for 10-20 min, do some weights on the very lightest settings, and water-walk/swim. I also do some walking, because it's NYC and you have to walk, and plus I don't have a car. But in the process of recovering, I somehow managed to shift my weight to the balls of my feet, and developed terrible bunions. My PT is helping me revamp my walking style, so I am walking a little more normal now, but these bunions are a killer so I don't walk as much as I did before.

My pre-surgery sport used to be jiujitsu (Japanese-influenced style, not Brazilian), which is a dangerous, full contact martial art. But I had to give it up about 3 years before my surgery because my back hurt so much and because I was afraid that the vertebrae around my lateral listhesis would snap some day after a heavy impact. Jiujitsu was the love of my life, and I was so sad to give it up. I was sort of harboring a hope that I could someday return to it now that my spine is fixed, or possibly take up some other form of martial art that didn't involve so much throwing and falling. But I have finally accepted that that's probably not in the cards. It's too dangerous, and I've invested too much in my new spine. I studied tai chi for a few years after I gave up jiujitsu, and recently I have started doing the first 2 minutes of my form a couple days a week, and I'm tolerating that well, and I think it's helping with my hip flexibility. I love yoga, but had to give that up before the surgery as well because it was too painful, but my PT is also a yoga instructor, and has been incorporating yoga poses and breathing into my PT, and she thinks I should be able to begin attending one of those special therapeutic yoga classes in the next few months.

In short, at 10 months post-op, I'm still nowhere near being able to return to athletics at the level I would like, and I feel I'm recovering much slower than some of you did/are, but I am so very grateful just for the improvements I've managed to make. I do see changes, however slow, in my strength and flexibility and stamina, so I am hoping that I will continue to improve. Because it's finally spring! And I do not want to lay in bed any more!

golfnut
04-18-2014, 04:21 PM
Please do not be "dismayed". It is way too early in your recovery to judge where you will be eventually. I did very little at 10 months post-op other than walking. I was allowed to walk in the pool and use light weights while laying on my back on the bed, but that was about it. At the time, I read on the forum about people who had surgery the same time I did and who seemed do me doing much more. I thought I was "behind". My surgeon didn't want me to even work with a physical therapist until I was a year post-op, other than a few specific exercises. I waited over a year before playing golf and 1 1/2 before riding my bike in the neighborhood with no hills. It was over two years before I returned to Zumba and I must modify some moves. The purpose of starting this thread was to give people hope that eventually they might be able to return to activities they love, even if it takes a long time and with modifications.
Hang in there. It takes a lot of patience to get through the recovery.

titaniumed
04-18-2014, 09:10 PM
Baroness

My surgeon also didn’t want me doing physical therapy other than walking outdoors. If it wasn’t for my broken shoulder being repaired at 10 months, I wouldn’t have discovered the benefits of mild physical therapy that’s used for shoulder repair operations. The arm bike was the most beneficial at that stage.

Fatigue continued for 2 years......and boy do I miss those daily naps! My second year was my fine tuning year, and getting back on skis was a bunch of work.....I almost quit. The rebuilding of the soft tissues required in skiing were quite stubborn and I proved that the legs are connected to the back! You really feel this as a skier.

After they go in and slice and dice and move everything, it takes a long long time to get back to normal as an older adult. The body just doesn’t repair itself as fast as when we are kids....
Too bad we couldn’t get stem cell injections for our recoveries to speed things up.

Hang in there, things will improve...

Ed

the_baroness
04-21-2014, 04:02 PM
Karen, Ed - I can't tell you how much better it made me feel to read your messages. I get discouraged sometimes. Thanks for the pep talk :)

Irina
04-21-2014, 11:24 PM
Hi Baroness,

Have you tried swimming using breast stroke? I also can not kick and twist and I don't even try because I don't think it's a good idea. But breast stroke works well for me. You'll find your way, just take it easy.

susancook
04-24-2014, 01:29 AM
Hey Baroness, so you are working full time? That is tiring! When you go to your gym, mix it up!
Walking in the water is great exercise. If swimming is too tiring, get a kick board and let your arms rest and just kick down a lap. If 2 laps make you tired, do one for a couple of weeks, then 2 laps. The point is keep doing it and gradually increase.

I find swimming a challenge also. I am now doing the breast stroke with a mask and snorkel as it hurts my neck too much to go up and take a breath with each stroke. Also, the frog kick with the back stroke might be ok.

Don't be discouraged....just keep doing something and do it a little bit more every week or two.

Susan

aileens
04-30-2014, 08:08 AM
Hi Baroness,

Your recovery sounds exactly like mine - I had a big pain setback at the ~7 month point and was really discouraged for a few months. For me it was about the 10.5 month point where I felt like I was turning the corner and that I was going to make it. I was doing about the same level of activity as you up until 11 months, when I was able to return to the barre classes that I loved before the surgery and my pain med use went down. I'm a couple of years younger than you and had 2 days of surgery, but maybe that's more normal for someone in our age bracket? In any case, it does get better but I can't figure out if there's any rhyme or reason as to the timing. I'm 14 months now and went to my first hard-core spin class last night that was half cycling and half plyometrics (body weight exercises like squats, planks, etc) - even though I was having some back pain yesterday (again, not sure why other than it's super cold here in the Boston area), I was more than ok and feel really good this morning, even though my legs are a sore mess. So hang in there and hopefully you'll start to feel better whenever it starts to warm up.

aileen

the_baroness
04-30-2014, 03:28 PM
Wow, Aileens, "hard-core spin class," that sounds awesome! And thanks, all for the tips on swimming. I've gone three times now, and each time it's a little easier. The last time I did 10 minutes of free-style (which is uncomfortable, and I actually hate it, but found I'm none the worse for wear afterwards), then 5 minutes of back-stroke (my favorite!) and 5 minutes of water-walking. And I did not immediately fall asleep once I got home. So maybe my endurance is improving! I've been going once a week, since that's when the pool is open and the least crowded, and then doing PT and bike and weights and walking and tai chi on the days in between (not all on the same days, I do mix it up.) Ok, I'm beginning to think that maybe I will survive this! Don't know what I would do without your encouragement, Forum-Friends.

djkinkead
04-30-2014, 08:03 PM
Hello JanetS,

I show Belgian Sheepdogs. I stopped for a while but finally made the trek back into the ring around 1.5 years post surgery--I had the full fusion.

You eventually learn how to gait yourself so you don't jar your back too much and you learn how to kneel and bend (a bit) to straighten up your dog...but it is a learned balancing act.

You do need to watch that you don't trip on your dog--falls can be bad...haven't done so yet, but haven't shown a lot either. My youngest dog is just coming into his own now, but is still a bit wild.

Hope this answers some questions!

springchicken
05-01-2014, 01:32 PM
Hi! I had a question for Megan and Aileen,

Both of you mentioned having pain incidents at 7 mos post op. May I ask if it was due to exercise or unrelated? I'm at four mos post op and starting to return to exercise slowly. I've been in PT for a few weeks now and have found it quite helpful. I think on my own I was trying to do too much. Now I've stuck with walking, for my cardio, and am gradually adding strengthening exercises.

Anyways, I finally feel like the past couple of weeks I've had a reduction in pain and I'm scared to death of having an incident that would set me back. I know its hard to avoid pain increases as we increase our activity, but I'd like to avoid any major setbacks if possible.

Thanks!

golfnut
05-01-2014, 08:34 PM
If I remember correctly, I had been doing a lot of walking at around 7 months post-op and was feeling great. I decided to kick it up a few notches and walked some steep hills at a local golf course for an hour and had a lot of pain afterwards for over a week. I finally called Dr. Lenke's office and they thought it was soft tissue pain and allowed me to take Aleve. It's just human nature that we want to rush everything in hopes that we get back to "normal" sooner rather than later and it often backfires.

JanetS
05-03-2014, 11:59 AM
Thank you for your encouraging update on showing dogs. The more things I learn I may be able to resume post surgery, the more comfortable I am with the idea of having it someday. I would probably avoid the outdoor rings as wet grass can be slippery and the surface can be uneven.
Good luck with your young boy. Please post updates to this thread when he is ready to show!

Janet

-----------
I show Belgian Sheepdogs. I stopped for a while but finally made the trek back into the ring around 1.5 years post surgery--I had the full fusion.

You eventually learn how to gait yourself so you don't jar your back too much and you learn how to kneel and bend (a bit) to straighten up your dog...but it is a learned balancing act.

You do need to watch that you don't trip on your dog--falls can be bad...haven't done so yet, but haven't shown a lot either. My youngest dog is just coming into his own now, but is still a bit wild.

Hope this answers some questions!

aileens
05-06-2014, 01:25 PM
Springchicken - I did way too much activity because I was feeling better. I can't remember everything I did over a 2 week period, but I know I clocked 14 miles of walking through NYC on my fitness tracker over a weekend and that was the last straw. Huge spike in pain, unfortunately! I took it easy for months afterwards, limiting myself to the gym no more than 3 times a week. The body is pretty good at telling you when you're getting ahead of yourself, just go slower than you think you need to. It's frustrating, but will save you in the long run.


Hi! I had a question for Megan and Aileen,

Both of you mentioned having pain incidents at 7 mos post op. May I ask if it was due to exercise or unrelated? I'm at four mos post op and starting to return to exercise slowly. I've been in PT for a few weeks now and have found it quite helpful. I think on my own I was trying to do too much. Now I've stuck with walking, for my cardio, and am gradually adding strengthening exercises.

Anyways, I finally feel like the past couple of weeks I've had a reduction in pain and I'm scared to death of having an incident that would set me back. I know its hard to avoid pain increases as we increase our activity, but I'd like to avoid any major setbacks if possible.

Thanks!

springchicken
05-09-2014, 08:02 AM
Thanks, Aileen, for your message. I could see that happening with me, too. I just returned to work this past week. I work from home and have to travel into work one day a week. It's a long commute, almost 2 hours, and it was definitely harder than I thought it would be. I was happy to get through it, though.

I think when you kick it up a notch, you are reminded of how far you have to go.

the_baroness
05-09-2014, 04:27 PM
Hi Springchicken - The thing that caused me a 2-month spike in pain following the 7-month mark, is pretty much the same thing that caused me a delay in responding to your question in a timely manner: house parties! At the time it happened, I was traumatized by the set-back, but now that I look back and notice a trend in my life, it's kind of funny :)

So, what happened at the 7-month point was this: it was December. My husband mentioned he wanted to have our usual somewhat raucus holiday party, and I saw no reason why not because I was starting to feel a little better, and I planned on sitting around like a queen with my feet up, greeting my beloved guests all evening. Didn't turn out that way. Almost immediately after we sent out the invites, my husband got slammed with a giant project at work, and I got stuck with handling the party planning and house-preparing. Leading up to the party I did some stupid things: Namely, I decided to touch up the paint on the walls, so I was dragging a ladder around and climbing up and down and kneeling on the floor a lot. The day of the party I did some even more stupid things, like walk 12 blocks to Costco in a snowstorm and then drag a shopping cart full of party supplies back home, and then walk a bunch more blocks to the bakery for cakes and cookies. Then it got even stupider, when I tried to clean the house: the works - sweeping, mopping, cleaning the bathrooms. By the time the guests arrived I was in so much pain. But I didn't want to look lame in front of everyone, so I stood around chit-chatting and hostessing. I basically delivered a one-two punch to my recovery all in one fell swoop. That was on Dec. 14. By the time Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and New Year's Eve rolled around, I was knackered. (We also hosted parties those days too! I tried to limit my participation, but by that point the damage was done.) And then the icing on the cake so to speak was that I tried to do some dancing at midnight on New Year's Eve (to Prince, as is our tradition.) What was I thinking! I'm bolted to the pelvis! I can't shake that booty anymore! Upshot: I spent the next 2 months in bed. I finally did recover from that bout of pain and exhaustion, with the help of my PT. We did nothing but stretching and heat packs for those 2 months. I saw a big leap of improvement beginning in March or so, but now we are planning another party at our house! A very joyous occasion of a friend's wedding, and I want to fix up our backyard so it's full of flowers and looks nice. So I've been trying to plant and put down mulch. I strategized for a long time before I began about how I could mulch without injuring myself, and I arranged to have my husband place the bags where I wouldn't have to bend or crouch, and I got a little bucket to use, and I thought it would be no problem to just carry small buckets of mulch back and forth for a while. But after 3 bags of mulch, the familiar and debilitating rib pain came roaring back, so I've been pretty out of commission for the last week. And the mulch still isn't done!

What have I learned from these two experiences? (A) I can't party like I used to :) and (B) it's not the actual motion or activity that causes the pain event. It's the over-doing it. Does that make sense? It's the pushing your body to move -- in any configuration -- you're not ready for. Any overdone physical activity at all will overdo it. I get the sense that the healing going on in there is a very complex procedure. It's like baking a cake. There's chemical reactions and physical reactions and heat and bubbling and stuff going on in there. And the process is not to be f***ed with, my friend. I sure did learn that the hard way. Baby steps. One bucket of mulch per day. Leave the cake alone and let it bake. That's enough metaphors for today :)

Yes, the body has ways of telling us things - loud and clear!

(And I should note, I think I was so vulnerable to the December pain incident because I went back to work too early. I went back at 4.5 months post op, and my Dr. said I should, but I honestly think it was too soon, because the commute and the sitting up all day had steadily been contributing to my exhaustion when I decided to push myself still further. Working in an office is not for the faint of heart! Don't discount just how exhausting it is to commute and to sit up. Be kind to yourself.)

titaniumed
05-09-2014, 07:51 PM
What have I learned from these two experiences? (A) I can't party like I used to :)


Baroness, you mentioned Prince. You mean you cant party like its 1999. (smiley face)

There was no way I could have done all that at 6 months post. Or go to work at 4 months. That would have been torture.

Ed

golfnut
05-09-2014, 08:16 PM
My purpose for starting this thread was to give people in the pre-op stage and those in the first year post-op hope that it would be possible that they would EVENTUALLY be able to return to most sports and activities that they enjoyed before surgery. I was so afraid that I would never play golf again, but had fortunately corresponded with people on the forum who were also golfers. They reassured me that they returned to golf after a year and that I could as well. Please don't try to do too much too soon. I had been walking several miles in flat subdivisions at about 5 months post-op. I thought I should kick it up a notch or two and walked extremely steep hills on a golf course. I was in pain for weeks! The problem is that while I was walking up those steep hills, I wasn't in pain and thought I was doing something to speed up my recovery. Wrong! It is so hard to be patient, but I think it's the answer. I can't stress the importance of walking as much as possible and if you are going to physical therapy, be certain that they understand the surgery and the reason for not being permitted to twist and bend.

springchicken
05-23-2014, 06:55 AM
I'm so sorry Megan/Baroness that I didn't write back in a timely manner after you were kind enough to share your story with me. I totally get it. I would imagine all that you did would have put anyone out (scoliosis surgery or not!), though it sounds like you were having fun. Glad you're not overdoing it now? Careful with that mulch! Ouch!


I'm optimistic after reading of peoples' return to activities postop, so thanks for starting this thread, Karen. One of the hardest parts of the recovery for me has been not being able to exercise like I used to.

golfnut
05-23-2014, 02:36 PM
Spring Chicken,
I always enjoyed exercise classes and missed them during the first year of recovering. I have returned to the less intense classes and make a few modifications-no crunches. I can get up and down from a floor mat without a problem but I am talking about well over a year. I probably won't go back to my spinning class because they stand up and pedal a lot. The first year I got plenty of exercise by walking and taking aqua aerobics. I was allowed to use arm weights while lying on my back on the bed. Give yourself time to heal and you will gradually get back to some of your exercises.

golfnut
12-26-2016, 08:59 PM
This is a thread I started during my recovery. I "bumped" it in case it might be of interest to anyone considering surgery or recovering.

JaniceD
12-28-2016, 07:14 AM
Thanks, Karen for bumping this up. I had not come across this thread in my months of browsing this forum.
These stories of success are exactly what I need to read about as one who is scheduled for surgery 3 months from today!!
Janice

ripley
01-12-2017, 10:18 AM
Thank you so much for bumping this thread up, I never would have seen it otherwise. I was so down and worried after reading the "Sorry I had it done" thread. After looking through this one I feel a bit better. Thank you!

golfnut
01-12-2017, 11:39 AM
It was important to me before my surgery and during the early months of recovery to know that there are people whose surgery not only stopped the curve progression, but improved their posture and self confidence, AND allowed them to still have an active life of sports, dancing, etc. I know that there are many out there with successful surgeries who no longer post on the forum. Think positively. :)

louise_23
02-08-2017, 04:02 PM
Hello,

I just came across this thread and wanted to reply in case it helps someone.

I had scoliosis surgery 7 years ago now and am now very active indeed. I go to the gym about 4-5 times a week and I do spin classes, body pump classes, metafit (high intensity interval training) and boxercise. I also like to run and have done several 5K and 10K races since my surgery including muddy obstacle course races! I am currently training to do some more 10K races this year to raise money for the Scoliosis Association and am hoping to do a trek in China at the end of the year (trekking part of the Great Wall of China) to raise money also.

I did used to go to the gym and was active before my surgery and to be honest it did take me a LONG while to get back into the gym again after surgery. I think it was around a year post op before I started going back to the gym properly and I have only felt strong enough in the last few years to start going to more advanced classes at the gym and running races etc. I have gradually built up my activity over the last 5 years or so. Before surgery and in the early stages of recovery I NEVER thought it would be possible to do all the activities I am now doing, so I'm really grateful. :)

Louise

titaniumed
02-08-2017, 11:31 PM
Hi Louise!

Nice to see you posting and I see that you have a great website!

Sad to see SSO end...it was a good forum.... I posted as Rod Stewart on SSO

China sounds like fun!

Ed

louise_23
02-15-2017, 01:20 PM
Hi Ed!

Thank you :-)

I'm going to try posting more as I do miss it! Hope you are well - I remember you :-) I miss SSo and the friends I made although keep in touch with many on Facebook. Hope you are well :)

Louise