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lisazena
05-06-2012, 11:27 AM
Hi all,
I've been building my walking by slowly adding more blocks and now I think it's time to see if I can help my progress with exercises in the pool. I thought I might walk in the pool and I read on this website (non-Forum section) that backstroke and sidestroke are good.

For others who have done this, when you walk in the water do you walk in barefeet or in water shoes? I have had past problems with plantar fasciitis, but haven't for awhile.

And for sidestroke--I have a left thoracolumbar curve--would it best to swim on my left or right side or both?

Any other suggested techniques?

I used to find breaststroke would stretch me out and make me feel good, but ever since I had a setback a year and a half ago regular swimming doesn't seem to provide relief though I haven't tried it for awhile and maybe it's time to try it again.

And, FYI, at this point, I have not had surgery. Thanks in advance for your suggestions.
Lisa

rohrer01
05-06-2012, 04:43 PM
Lisazena,

When I swim, I do a combination of breast stroke, back stroke and side stroke. I do both sides even though one side is easier than the other. I don't know if my way is correct, but I don't want to build up muscles on only one side of my body by favoring my stronger side. I am currently NOT swimming, as I have had issues in the past with our pool. I'm by no means a professional, just telling you what I do. I usually swim across the pool with the breast stroke and come back with with the back stroke, then do one side stroke across the pool and come back on the other side, then do the back stroke and start the pattern all over again. I kind of feel like a rolling log in the pool, but it keeps me from getting too tired too quickly. If, when I start out, I get too tired, I will just do "floating" back strokes until I catch my breath. I, personally can't do the correct backstroke that easily as the scoliosis inhibits my range of motion when making big circles with my arms. So my version of the back stroke is the floating back stroke where my arm stay in the water and come up no farther than shoulder level when I propel myself.

I hope this was somewhat helpful. I haven't had surgery either.

lisazena
05-06-2012, 07:32 PM
Rohrer,
Thanks for your thoughts.
It's interesting what you said about not wanting to build strength on just one side.

All,
I am looking for what is easiest on the spine. If anyone has had PT, what did you learn about what was easiest on the spine?
Thanks,
Lisa

LindaRacine
05-06-2012, 07:56 PM
Hi Lisa...

I water walked after my surgeries last year. I did wear water shoes, but only because I wanted to protect myself against athlete's foot.

--Linda

lisazena
05-07-2012, 04:28 PM
Hi Lisa...

I water walked after my surgeries last year. I did wear water shoes, but only because I wanted to protect myself against athlete's foot.

--Linda

Thanks Linda--the dreaded Athlete's Foot--something I definitely want to avoid.

By thw way, obviously water walking is a little easier than walking on land, but did you find the benefits greater too? That you developed more stamina to walk further that transferred to land? Reduced pain? I'm interested in your thoughts.
Lisa

LindaRacine
05-07-2012, 08:48 PM
Hi Lisa...

It's hard to know for sure, but I definitely felt strong by the time I returned to work. When I water walked, I did it in a shallow pool, which is, in many ways, harder than a deep pool. I would literally walk as fast as I could.

--Linda

loves to skate
05-07-2012, 09:57 PM
Thanks Linda--the dreaded Athlete's Foot--something I definitely want to avoid.

By thw way, obviously water walking is a little easier than walking on land, but did you find the benefits greater too? That you developed more stamina to walk further that transferred to land? Reduced pain? I'm interested in your thoughts.
Lisa

Lisa, I did a lot of water exercises including water walking before I had surgery and although it helped to keep me strong, it really didn't help me to transfer to walking on land. For me, surgery was the only thing that helped with walking.
Sally

lisazena
05-08-2012, 09:56 AM
Linda,
Thanks for explaining your technique. I want to keep it as easy and stress free as possible so no walking in shallow water.

Sally,
And thanks for your thoughts. I realize swimming is by no means a fix. I'm just not quite ready for the big fix and still feel like my presentation is a little different than others (no significant stenosis) and I don't get pain when I walk and stand. The problems come after with paresthesias--throbbing/pulsing, binding and tightening of my leg opposite the curve if I walk or stand too much.

No one loved walking more than me and I can walk for 15 minutes (something I built up again to recently) but can feel really lousy after. I do recover and am now walking enough to enjoy myself.

So I will persist a little longer, but probably ultimately will do surgery.
Lisa