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kootenaygal
10-26-2011, 11:42 PM
I have had scoliosis, since a young girl. I'm now 60, and my Kyphosis is excessively curved. The lordosis has caused my T-12 to collapse, and my lumbar is now wedged. I have been doing as much as I can to keep myself moving....deep water running, & physio ( mainly IMS ( inter-muscular stimulation). My physio therapist, thinks that I no longer have a choice...it is already effecting my lung function ( on oxygen at night). But my back is getting steadily worse...now on morphine for pain control. I was seen by a back surgeon, who examined my back, and studied my MRI. He spent a short time with us, saying that he did need to study my MRI more carefully, with 3 other back surgeons. At that time, he would beable to answer more of our questions.
But he did say, that I would have 2 options....either do nothing, and deal with the collapse & pain, OR have extensive back surgery, which would involve rods and screws. He also said our decision should not be taken lightly, as it was a risky operation, at which point he discussed the risks. We were told to go home, and educate ourselves about this kind of surgery, through support groups, and chatting with others who have had this surgery. I will be meeting with him at the beginning of December, for more x-rays....and many of my questions.
I need to hear from others who have had back surgery, with rods & screws. What kind of pain are you in now. What was your recovery like...how long did it take to feel, that you were happy you had the surgery. I have so many questions...and I'm so undecided as to what to do. We are having a appt. with my physio therapist, & our family doctor, to discuss the surgery.
Looking forward to hearing from anyone, who has had this surgery as a adult...and their thoughts now.
thanks...Kootenaygal

Marina63
10-27-2011, 07:11 AM
Hi K!
It sounds to me like you don't have much of a choice. Collapse and pain or surgery? I had the scoli surgery in July. I have 13 levels fused. Two 12 inch rods and 26 screws. My scoliosis was not as dire as your situation but I had the surgery in order to avoid exactly what you are going through now.

In my opinion, I would have the surgery if I were you. It's definitely a risky surgery but the alternative seems riskier to me. It's a slow recovery process, the first weeks are tough but you have to look at this big picture. A year or so of recovery and then the rest of your life feeling much better.

I'm sure you will get a lot of feedback from this forum It's terrific and everyone is very supportive.

best of luck to you!

Marina

Doreen1
10-27-2011, 07:35 AM
Hi Kootenaygal,

Thank you for sharing your journey. You've come to the right place for advice/insight/suggstions all things scoli. I am scheduled for full fusion T4 - sacrum next year. My spine is collapsing, have lost 3" in height this year, and the pain is unbearable. My goals are to stop the curves progressing and elliminate some pain. Currently have T70* and L68*; the curves were at 40* five years ago. I've lived the past 10 years in pain and the quality of my life have greatly diminished this year (unable to do things with my family). I also have breathing issues because my ribs are compressed into my pelvis and am now wheezing.

I turned to this forum in July to learn how surgical technology has advanced over the years. It was overwhelming to me in a positive way to learn about the amazing surgeries being done with remarkable outcomes. What are your current curve(s) measurements?

Two pieces of advice I have for you at this stage:
#1 Decide what your goals are. Do you want to stop your curve(s) from progressing? Do you want to minimize pain? Do you want to have improved quality of life?

#2 Get second or third opinions from the most qualified scoli surgeons. The surgeon ultimately selected to do one's operation is key to the success of the outcome.

After reading the abundance of information on this forum, my confidence grew so that I realized now is the right for me to surgery because I'm the healthiest (aside from my spine) I've ever been in my life, the technology is right and I'm physically and mentally ready to reclaim my life from the disease that's been slowing robbing me over the years.

You will receive many responses from those who are now "on the other side" of surgery. I hope you gather great info here.

Warmly,
Doreen

walkingmom
10-27-2011, 08:48 AM
Hi Kootenaygal,

You have come to a great forum for gathering info following spinal fusion surgery. I am approaching the six mos. post-op mark. Prior to my surgery, I was in great physical shape (for a scoli patient) thanks to playing tennis and walking. I currently walk about 3-4 miles/day, but I do continue to have nerve pain. I am hoping that it will eventually stop, but I have not reached that point yet.

Frankly, I wished that my surgery was not necessary, but with a progressive curve along with trunk rotation that I was feeling, I didn't really have a choice. It was either wait for the curve and pain to get worse or have the surgery now. With that being the case, I am glad that the surgery is behind me. I am just not a real "patient patient" when it comes to recovery issues.

So if you decide to have the surgery, it is most helpful to have a strong support system. I was blessed to have my husband who was able to be home with me for a month following surgery. Also, it is very encouraging to read the postings of others who are further out from their surgery date. I still have a way to go before I can resume my pre-surgery activities, but I am slowly making progress toward doing so.

Getting input from fellow scoli patients is invaluable and will help put your mind at ease that you are making the right decision. Best of luck to you as you sort everything out.
Donna

Elisa
10-27-2011, 09:37 AM
Kootenagal, are you from the Kootnies in BC? :-)

I am not as knowledgeable about adult scoliosis as it is my son who has scoliosis but it looks like you're getting some good advice, and welcome.

LindaRacine
10-27-2011, 10:56 AM
Hi kootenaygal....

I had scoliosis surgery 20 years ago, at the age of 42. My recovery was pretty long and hard. I had revision surgery in January of this year, to add another 4 levels to my fusion. While it wasn't a very fun time, my recovery was truly only 3-4 months long.

Recovery rates vary considerably, but most people are able to return to work within 3-6 months.

Regards,
Linda

Karen Ocker
10-27-2011, 06:39 PM
I had a very extensive revision-at age 60- of an old fashioned non-instrumented originall scoliosis surgery done at age 14 in 1956. This lasted until I was 59.
I had lost lung tissue and 3 inches in height. My surgery 9 years ago--with rods, screws, wires and a cage gave me my life back.

I have absolutely no pain and am 691/2. I worked until last year at a job which required standing all day.

My decision was based on the fact it was getting worse and my expected life expectancy would be shortened--not to mention quality of life.

I was so grateful I could be helped. My suggestion: see the best recommended scoliosis surgeon who specializes in adults. It is a big risky surgery but I didn't even dwell on that. My surgeon told me not to wait too long because the larger the curve the less chance of a good correction. I got 50% correction.

I was: 30 cervical, 80 thoracic and 40 lumbar.

djkinkead
10-27-2011, 06:51 PM
Hi kootenaygal,

Welcome to the forum.

I am 57 and just had the spinal fusion surgery two months ago. If you go to my website in my signature, you can see how badly my spine was curved and rotated before and after my surgery.

I think the best advice I can give you is to look for the BEST surgeon your health system will allow. Not all spine surgeons are created equal. Look for references from patients and from other surgeons--who would THEY go to to operate on themselves?

Also look for a hospital that would have some expertise in spinal surgery...for example, the hospital I went to in Baltimore, MD, had a dedicated spinal surgery wing. Everyone on their staff knew exactly what to do for me as I went through the five day stay at the hospital. They knew what drugs I needed to keep me comfortable. If I needed something stronger, they knew what to give me.

It sounds like you really don't have a choice, and I understand where you are coming from. If I didn't have this surgery, most likely in about ten years my spine would have pushed a lung into my heart and well, game over.

The first four to five days post surgery you are pretty out of it due to heavy duty drugs. The drugs continue, but lighten up as the weeks/months go by. To be honest, I have no idea where the month of September went.

Anyway, my first input for you: FIND THE BEST SURGEON.

paula
10-27-2011, 11:05 PM
I'm 4.5 months out, and other than being tired, I'm much better than before the surgery. The only advice I have is a repeat of what others have said-interview several surgeons and research their backgrounds. Ask how many similar surgeries each doctor does. Actually one other bit of advice. Do what you can to get in as good of shape as possible by the surgery- diet, exercise, sleep- as much as you can within your limitations.

kootenaygal
10-29-2011, 02:31 PM
Thank you everyone for your advice...this site is absolutely great. A positive addition to my scoli life.
thanks again...:o)) Kootenaygal

kootenaygal
11-04-2011, 11:58 PM
Kootenaygal here. My husband & I went to see our family doctor today, to discuss his views regarding back surgery. We really value his opinion. He received a memo from the surgeon.."" Surgical intervention in my case would be very MAJOR, likely requiring instrumentation, decompression, and spinal osteotomy with correction of the deformity. This is a very, very, very MAJOR procedure for a 60 year old woman, who probably has some element of osteoporosis."

Our doctor, feels that I would be in more pain, from the rods, and pins, than I am now. I know if there is any risk of complications...I know it would happen to me. I don't seem to miss anything. :o(

I'm not concerned about my appearance...but as I collapse further, what will happen to my lung function, and internal organs? My ribs are already touching my hips...my kyphosis is so bad. I don't know my degree of collapse...but my physio therapist says it's big. My doctor, says...as soon as there is any change in my lung function, or effects on my organs...no choice, but to have the surgery.

We see the surgeon again in the beginning of December...do the risks in my case, out weigh the benefits of having the surgery. I am so afraid of the surgery, and the recovery. I wish I knew what to do!!
I am doing that new urine test, that tells if I am losing bone...and I'm having another bone density later this month.

Has anyone had this back surgery with rods etc. who may also be osteo??

This is such a amazing support group...looking forward to seeing some replies! :o)
Kootenaygal.

jrnyc
11-05-2011, 12:54 AM
if you go to the top of the page, to "advanced search" and type in "osteoporosis,"
another screen will come up...i then typed in key words of "osteoporosis" and "osteopenia"
and checked off to search in forum and posts....then clicked search...
i came up with 70 posts on the subject...

i have met several general doctors and also several pain management doctors who
speak against a patient having spinal surgery for scoliosis

i think the most important thing is to meet with several scoli surgeons...
or as many as you can since you are dealing with the Canadian system...
and see if they all recommend the same surgical procedure....

would you consider coming to the States just to consult with a top
scoli surgeon here....like in NYC or CA...? just for their opinion on your
individual case?

i don't remember seeing what size your curves are, or whether you ahve other problems, like degenerative discs,
hypo or hyper kyphosis, etc....
how long a fusion did they say you would need?
scoli surgery involves rods and screws for all who have it...

best of luck...
jess

JenniferG
11-05-2011, 05:30 AM
This surgery for us older ladies/men who require fairly extensive correction and instrumentation, is always major. I am concerned that you're making a decision based on your family doctor's fear of the surgery, a person who possibly has little or no experience with this type of surgery. My advice is to get 2 or 3 opinions from Scoliosis surgeons who have plenty of experience on mature scoli patients and be guided by that. There are many here older than you who've had the surgery and benefited greatly.

Of course, the decision is yours in the end and can only be based on advice given and your desire or lack of desire for the surgery, after weighing up all possibilities. It's possible you may be advised against surgery, however, it needs to come from a specialist in the field, I believe.

It's very very hard to make this decision. Best of luck!

golfnut
11-05-2011, 08:29 AM
I had surgery 10 months ago at age 60 and have had a smooth recovery other than overdoing it a few weeks ago. You can check my signature for more details of my surgery. I had one of the best surgeons in the country, but was still terrified. As others have said, you need to be sure to find an excellent scoli surgeon who is experienced with complex scoliosis surgeries. You can't listen to opinions from those with little knowledge of this surgery. A month before my surgery my tap dancing instructor told me I was making a huge mistake. Good luck with your decision.

Pooka1
11-05-2011, 08:45 AM
A month before my surgery my tap dancing instructor told me I was making a huge mistake.

Stunning. A tap dance instructor has an opinion about spine deformity surgery. Yet another Candid Camera moment for me at least.

djkinkead
11-05-2011, 09:56 AM
K.,

I am 57 and have osteopenia and had the surgery. Like you, if I hadn't had it, evenutally my organs would be compressed against each other and well, game over. As you can see my before and after pictures in my website, I have 25 screws and two rods.

I agree with Golfnut in that it sounds like your family physician really doesn't understand your condition or the great leaps in technologies and tecniques they now do with this type of surgery. I am glad you are going to see a Spinal surgeon who knows what he/she is talking about.

Once again. Do your research--find the best surgeon you can. There are lots of surgeon's who say they can do this surgery and perform a couple a year. Look for one who has done a Residency at a spinal surgery hospital/school. I have a friend who went to a surgeon and just had a few vertebre (sp?) fused and he is now suffering from major pain....what's sad is he doesn't live that far from Baltimore where there are several top notch spinal surgeons.

Bigger cities will have better surgeons. You may have to travel to get the best. It's worth it.

Karen Ocker
11-05-2011, 12:21 PM
We on this forum have learned by bitter experience:
Persons with absolutely no knowledge about scoliosis give dangerous advice.
Seeing a regular ortho or family doctor is a waste of money.
There are many ignorant fear mongers.
Seeing an experienced scoliosis surgeon-preferably recommended by someone who has a similar situation is most helpful.
I had a very extensive surgery 9 years ago at age 60-I am pain free.
I have: Isola rods, pedicle screws, laminar wires and a pelvic screw. I am fused T-4 to sacrum.
Since surgery I have: hiked in the Alps, worked standing up day, shampooed carpets, gardened, helped care for my terminally I'll mom last year, cut my toenails, be a good wife, watch my grandchildren etc.,
I like most have"osteopenia" normal for my age. I go to the gym and hike- never broke a bone.

LindaRacine
11-05-2011, 12:26 PM
I don't think anyone is doing us a favor, to use fear to talk anyone out of surgery. For about 5 years before I had my initial scoliosis surgeries 20 years ago, I heard at least 3-4 medical professionals tell me that, while doctors were now routinely doing scoliosis surgeries on adults, it should be avoided at all costs. I spent 5 years in a lot of pain because I feared even going to see a specialist.

While scoliosis surgery is something to avoid if it's really not necessary, it's not the nightmare that many of us have been led to believe. Everyone needs to think about all of the issues when making an informed decision. Those issues include:


curve magnitude
known progression
risk of progression
age
pulmonary function
bone quality
pain
loss of function
failure of conservative treatment
status of health insurance
work status
family/friend status & support (e.g., does the person have small children at home, does the person have adequate support from family/friends to help out during recovery)
significant co-morbidities
does the person understand the potential risks
realistic expectation of the outcome

kootenaygal
11-05-2011, 03:41 PM
Thank you everyone, for your advice...I'll follow thru with all of your suggestions. I see the back surgeon at the beginning of December, and will also be asking for referrals for 2nd opinions, from my family doctor.
I value your opinions, and replies...what a wonderful support group for everyone!!! Thanks again....

titaniumed
11-05-2011, 03:43 PM
I have had many expert opinions from all sorts of people through the years. Usually these are people who have no idea what scoliosis is. Funny how that works. Sound like Andy Rooney? Yes, it does. Rest in peace, we will miss you.

Opinions on subjects are quickly offered with minimal thought by many, even Andy did it, but he sometimes retracted on his statements AFTER careful thought....a learning process.

We as adult scoliosis sufferers have thought about our afflictions for many years and even I have changed views on scoliosis related subject matters. The one thing is, at least we have thought deeply about it.

Doctors and surgeons have thought about it. Each will have their views, most will say yes, its serious or major, its their duty. It seems that a good surgeon or doctor will START this way, it’s the best way to make a patient think. If a surgeon say’s, lets schedule next week, I would fly to Hawaii.

I have had surgeon’s ask me how, and how long have I been controlling my pain, it seems that they need to know that the patient has exhausted all non-surgical resources, and is running out of options. In other words, “last ditch effort”. I was there, mind blowing pain and out of time. Complications were 100% guaranteed. I had to gamble. Robert Redford’s million dollar pass line bet.

Kootenay, Let me tell you, it came up 7. I lost my gall bladder, a rare complication of scoli surgeries, but a very small thing....most complications in scoliosis are usually small things, probably the main goal with surgery is being pain free.

I waited 34 years. I waited because I was scared, but I knew that technology would advance which it did.....leaps and bounds.
Ed

Pooka1
11-05-2011, 04:53 PM
Opinions on subjects are quickly offered with minimal thought by many,

The problem isn't minimal thought. The problem is less than zero knowledge.

A lay person doesn't know enough not to have an opinion. For a lay person to have an opinion at all is raising cluelessness to a zen art.

rohrer01
11-05-2011, 05:30 PM
As Linda mentioned, people should not use fear to talk someone out of surgery. I have not had surgery, but I have a step-cousin that had a life or death surgery. She has congenital scoliosis. She was raised by her father who refused to let them operate on her for fear she would die. When she reached 18, her mom had her come to CA where she had the surgery to save her life. She could only be corrected to 60* because of a hemiverterbrae (that's my understanding anyway). She has the old-fashioned Harrington rods that left her flat backed. She is now not healthy enough to go through another surgery to revise or do something new to help her (she is totally disabled). She is on oxygen and has almost died at least two times that I know of from limited lung function (she was found passed out and blue and not breathing). She is only in her early 50's.

I have another friend that desperately needed lumbar fusion. She was so scared to have it because she was a Medical Assistant in the OR during these surgeries and it frightened her. Her spine has now self-fused and she is inoperable and in a wheel-chair and has very strong pain meds. That was her choice, but now she doesn't have a choice and she is only 62.

I hope this post doesn't offend anyone. I'm not trying to scare you into having surgery, either. It's just a person has to consider this option while they are still a surgical candidate because at some point you may not have a choice. It's a tough call and I feel really bad that you are in this condition. I would definitely recommend talking to skilled scoliosis surgeons to help you make your choice. The SRS has a list of many of the doctors that specialize in this. Best Wishes to you whatever you decide.

Pooka1
11-05-2011, 05:43 PM
A random tap dance instructor disagrees with one of the top spine surgeons in the world, Dr. Lenke, on a particular treatment course for a particular patient.

I just want that to detonate in people's minds.

Where do you get that kind of blind nerve? Can you buy it?

Elisa
11-05-2011, 06:04 PM
This surgery for us older ladies/men who require fairly extensive correction and instrumentation, is always major. I am concerned that you're making a decision based on your family doctor's fear of the surgery, a person who possibly has little or no experience with this type of surgery. My advice is to get 2 or 3 opinions from Scoliosis surgeons who have plenty of experience on mature scoli patients and be guided by that. There are many here older than you who've had the surgery and benefited greatly.

Of course, the decision is yours in the end and can only be based on advice given and your desire or lack of desire for the surgery, after weighing up all possibilities. It's possible you may be advised against surgery, however, it needs to come from a specialist in the field, I believe.

It's very very hard to make this decision. Best of luck!
^^ Ditto to what Jennifer and others are saying here. No offense, BUT this is your family doctor's opinion you're talking about, a general practitioner, a 'jack of all trades' so to speak and is NOT a scoliosis expert. Keep on keeping on with your research, testing and upcoming appointment with your surgeon before even considering making a final decision. I'm still skeptical of our system (bad experience) here in BC too btw so there's another thought.

rohrer01
11-06-2011, 12:16 AM
A random tap dance instructor disagrees with one of the top spine surgeons in the world, Dr. Lenke, on a particular treatment course for a particular patient.

I just want that to detonate in people's minds.

Where do you get that kind of blind nerve? Can you buy it?

KAPLOW! The shockwaves are spreading!

Lorraine 1966
11-06-2011, 01:14 AM
Loved the answers to this question, and the humerous quotes Sharon I should just go to that tap dancer when I need to have a brain freeze. Rohrer01 so very sorry to read about your friends, that is so very sad. Both of those cases very easily!could have been myself, I am just so lucky.


Lorraine.

golfnut
11-06-2011, 09:01 AM
By the way, I returned to my tap class a few months ago. My instructor raved about how tall and straight I am, but then announced to the class: "Karen is one in a million who has had a successful back surgery. I know so many people who do not get good results.". Some people just think they're experts on everything and feel it is their duty to help others make major decisions.

Kayde
11-06-2011, 10:57 AM
I was diagnosed at14. Refused brace or surgery. Never regretting not doing it. 2years ago at 43 I was diagnosed with extreme osteoporosis. I had a hormone check and ot on good vitamins. My t scores improved so fast my family dr se t me back for another bone scan. I went from -4.7 to normal range. But in the meantime my scoliosis that I had managed with massage and acupuncture was getting worst. I had been told by 4 doctors I was too old and would have to learn to live with the pain. My curves were 74 and 36. Which was a shock because I had stayed the same since my diagnosis. I found someone who specializes in adult corrections and he and I talked thru the entire treatment plan. I also took some awesome suggestions from this forum. And having said i would never have surgery I did it Monday before last this year. So I'm only a few weeks out. It hasn't been a picnic but I breath SO much better now. The crease in my abdomen is gone and I have a waist on both sides now. The pain is less each day. But before surgery I was afraid I would have to start living on pain pills. I would check with a lot of doctors. Seems bad information to tell some to just wait and see when u r clearly n pain. And your age should have nothing to do with how u heal. Although it can take u a little longer. My family dr didn't want me to do it because he was scared I could br in more pain. Then he saw the MRI and the x-rays that showed I was getting worse. But for me so many daily activities were limited and the pain was so bad in that leg and hip I just did the surgery to prevent further damage and deformity. Get some real honest opinions even if you go to one of the colleges of medicine the can give u good information

Kayde
11-06-2011, 11:02 AM
There is a post about meeting someone who had this done. Just in case u haven't seen it I thought I would share it with u




I chatted to a 72 y.o. patient doing a walk around the halls with a walking stick. She said she'd had spinal fusion surgery for scoliosis 12 days ago. She looked great, said she had very little pain and is amazed at what her doctor has achieved. She said her curve had been "over 70" and she looked quite straight to me. She asked me loads of questions and she was impressed with the way I was standing and moving and that I had no pain. She was bright and optimistic

jrnyc
11-06-2011, 11:14 AM
i think those two examples rohr gave are pretty extreme...
i feel really bad for them as well...
but i think more often the situation is patients with scoliosis who do not
have the surgery...who just live with the pain and difficulties it brings..
severe and dire consequences, i suspect, are more the exception than the rule...
that is not to discourage anyone from having the surgery...
just to try to give perspective....
then again, there is no guarantee that the surgery will eliminate pain..
for some of us, it is a very tough decision to make...

jess

titaniumed
11-06-2011, 11:47 AM
Some reading material from a few experts....

RESULTS FROM SURGERY

Adult patients who undergo major spinal surgery to correct their scoliosis generally do well. Pain is relieved in the majority. The fusion is successfully achieved and the correction maintained long term in 85-95% of people who have mild to moderate scoliosis corrected with or without nerve root decompression.

Complications can occur however, such as failure of the spine to solidly fuse, failure of the spine hardware (5%), infection (2-5%), ?nerve injury (>1%),medical complications, and others. The patients at greatest risk for complications are people taking steroids and those with severe osteoporosis or poor nutrition.

We recently presented to the Scoliosis Research Society and the North American Spine Society the results of three different studies of adult patients with stiff degenerative scoliosis. All patients required fusion with instrumentation of the spine to the sacrum. Several had severe spinal imbalance. A full 2 years after their surgery, all patients reported significant improvement in their pain. Narcotic medication decreased from 73% before surgery to 9% after surgery. The tech used were considered successful and promising

http://www.scoliosis-assoc.org/default.tpl?PageID=55&cart=13205995391440343&PageName=TYPES%20OF%20SCOLIOSIS&sec_id=55&sec_status=main

Ed

loves to skate
11-06-2011, 04:26 PM
I was 67 when I was fused L2 to the sacrum with pelvic fixation. I am still dealing with some nerve pain. My surgery was very complicated since my nerve roots were so entrapped. The pain that I have now is more annoying than debilitating unlike the pain I had before surgery which was becoming more and more debilitating. If I had to choose over again knowing then what I know now, I would still choose to have the surgery in a heartbeat. I absolutely refused to be wheelchair bound before my time.

I disagree with Jess who thinks Rohr's two examples are rare for those who choose not to have surgery. We have had people on this forum who missed their window of opportunity to have surgery, either they waited too long and were too old or they developed other health problems that precluded them from having surgery. I wish I could remember their names, but we no longer hear from them. You ladies with osteoporosis are very fortunate that medical science has come out with Forteo which builds bones faster than fosamax and other osteoporosis medication. If Forteo had been available only five years ago, I might have gotten a better correction.

Sally

nanlo
11-06-2011, 08:29 PM
Dear Kootenaygal,
You expressed that you'd like to hear from people who have had the surgery. I had a fusion T1 to sacrum 1 year and 3 months ago. I had curves 91 and 86 and a fusion from when I was 14 (I am 58 now), so that parts of my spine were almost like solid bone. THANKFULLY, the orthopedic surgeon here referred me to Dr Lenke in St Louis, MO. I am not the only complicated case he agreed to take on that other surgeons wouldn't. Also, I am sure that his results are among the very best. I don't know if coming to the US is an option for you, but I do know that the surgeon you choose will make all the difference in your outcome.
My curves are now 50 and 45. I am well balanced, and in no pain. My recovery went incredibly well. I was off all pain meds in 4 weeks, and driving. It is a really scary leap, but if you are able to go to one of the top surgeons, and they decide that you are a good candidate, my opinion is that it's worth it!
Good luck!
Nancy

Elisa
11-06-2011, 09:06 PM
I don't think seeing Lenke is a possibility for her. There are very good surgeons here in Canada but maybe crossing province borders is where it's at, if of course that is possible with our Medicare.

titaniumed
11-06-2011, 09:09 PM
Hey Nancy

Its great to hear from you! Glad that everything is great! I had to take a peek at your x-rays again.....just incredible!

You must be so happy!

Ed

nanlo
11-08-2011, 08:37 PM
thank you, I want to try to visit the forum more. When I went to St Louis for my 1 year appt, I was lucky to meet two of the members in person and it inspired me to keep in touch. Sorry to be a bit off topic, but I just want to express my appreciation of the support of the forum.

Doreen1
11-09-2011, 12:40 PM
thank you, I want to try to visit the forum more. When I went to St Louis for my 1 year appt, I was lucky to meet two of the members in person and it inspired me to keep in touch. Sorry to be a bit off topic, but I just want to express my appreciation of the support of the forum.

It was such a blessing to meet you, Nancy! :-)

Warmly,
Doreen

kootenaygal
11-27-2011, 01:15 AM
I'm off to Edmonton this week, to have another consult with my surgeon, and for another " standing" x-ray, to see if my curve degrees has increased any, these past few weeks. I will be finding out what degree my kyphosis is. I'm very anxious to find out, if I'm a good candidate for this surgery. So many questions !!

I'm terrified, but not having the surgery....would result in the additional collapse of my spine (Kyphosis) and it's further effects on my lung function, and vital organs. I see, I'm no different, from anyone else, who has made to make this decision.
I've just completed the urine test, to see if I'm loosing any bone, and have my bone density test this week.
The deciding factor, may also be the element of osteo in my spine.

This forum, has been so helpful. When I joined a few weeks ago...I knew nothing, about surgery with rods, screws, fusions etc. etc. And the recovery from this surgery.

Thank you for all of your replies...and I'll be posting another message, in a couple weeks.

Kootenay gal

debbei
11-27-2011, 07:56 AM
I'm off to Edmonton this week, to have another consult with my surgeon, and for another " standing" x-ray, to see if my curve degrees has increased any, these past few weeks. I will be finding out what degree my kyphosis is. I'm very anxious to find out, if I'm a good candidate for this surgery. So many questions !!

I'm terrified, but not having the surgery....would result in the additional collapse of my spine (Kyphosis) and it's further effects on my lung function, and vital organs. I see, I'm no different, from anyone else, who has made to make this decision.
I've just completed the urine test, to see if I'm loosing any bone, and have my bone density test this week.
The deciding factor, may also be the element of osteo in my spine.

This forum, has been so helpful. When I joined a few weeks ago...I knew nothing, about surgery with rods, screws, fusions etc. etc. And the recovery from this surgery.

Thank you for all of your replies...and I'll be posting another message, in a couple weeks.

Kootenay gal

Yes this forum is fantastic isn't it? The people here saved my sanity prior to (and even after) surgery.

For me, waiting to the point where I would have been debilitated and in a wheel chair was just not an option for me. I saw what scoliosis did to my maternal grandmother the last 15 or so years of her life, and I had no interest being in that condition. I had my surgery at 46, and I am glad that I did.