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cbiondillo
12-31-2010, 03:05 PM
Hello,
Does anyone know if Pilates is good or bad for Scoliosis?

Thank you!!

Ballet Mom
12-31-2010, 04:38 PM
Hello,
Does anyone know if Pilates is good or bad for Scoliosis?

Thank you!!

Pilates can be very good for scoliosis, but you need to find a practitioner that is very familiar with scoliosis. Usually former professional ballerinas are good because they have been surrounded by scoliosis during their careers and can recognize it easily, way before doctors can, and usually have lots of dancers with scoliosis they work with.

I had one former ABT ballerina who now is an expert Pilates instructor and she has told me of cases she has worked on where the curves have been actually reduced. I obviously have no way of verifying this, and I can imagine the shrieks that will come in response, but apparently there are people who respond to Pilates. If I had the extra money and time, I would definitely be pursuing it for my daughter, but it is definitely not cheap.

LindaRacine
12-31-2010, 05:03 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Pilates-Therapeutics-%C3%82%C2%AE-Scoliosis-Part/dp/B000NAHCEY/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1293836402&sr=8-2

http://www.amazon.com/Pilates-Therapeutics-%C3%82%C2%AE-Scoliosis-Part/dp/B000OEHMYY/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1293836402&sr=8-5

http://www.amazon.com/Pilates-Fragile-Backs-Recovering-Flexibility/dp/1572244666/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1293836402&sr=8-4

cbiondillo
12-31-2010, 07:07 PM
Thank you for the links for the books about Pilates & Scoliosis.

My daughter takes a Pilates class once a week before ballet. The instructor is a former ballet teacher. I don't know if she knows about my daughter's scoliosis though. I'm going to mention it to her at the next class. Unless you're really looking for it, it's not really that apparent.

Thanks for the help!

Karen Ocker
01-02-2011, 01:16 PM
I did Pilates, for about 4 years before my revision and 8 years after. I had a certified, private instructor who worked around my spine issues. It felt good and kept me in good condition but it did not keep my previously, un-instrumented, fused, spinal curves from progressing. I still needed a revision. My experienced instructor never saw a permanent, documented, progressive curve be reduced or stopped with Pilates. That being said, it did allow me to go into surgery in better condition and, thus help me to recover. Specifically, it enabled me to use certain Pilates techniques to move arond more comfortably immediately after surgery.
She mentioned an lady of advanced age with a large curve who was flexible(the back would uncurve hanging from a bar) but she would always collapse into her large curve no matter what.

Resilience
01-02-2011, 11:13 PM
I'd like to add another book to the list: "Curves, Twists and Bends" by Annette Wellings published in 2010. I found it very helpful for my own nagging low grade problems. It's insightfully written by a Pilates Instructor with Scoliosis and am doing some of the exercises with my daughter at home.

Ballet Mom
01-03-2011, 10:22 AM
Cheryl,

If your daughter's Pilates instructor hasn't figured out that your daughter has scoliosis on her own and knows how to work with it, she may not be the right person to achieve anything other than ballet strength training.

I should point out that the Pilates instructor that I was talking to was telling me about younger ballet dancers/students with curves between 30 and 40 degrees achieving a reduction. There's a difference between very large, mature curves and smaller, youthful, flexible curves. The purpose is not to just work around the scoliosis but to work with it.

kidbusiness2
01-03-2011, 01:11 PM
I got pilates bands and started doing the stretches and stuff on my own in addition with stretches the physical therapist recommended. They do help temporarily, but if I don't do it everyday, I'm back in the same boat. I would assume/pressume without any other info. or research that pilates would be excellent for us sufferers with the right supervision! GOOD LUCK!

Karen Ocker
01-03-2011, 06:20 PM
Cheryl,

If your daughter's Pilates instructor hasn't figured out that your daughter has scoliosis on her own and knows how to work with it, she may not be the right person to achieve anything other than ballet strength training.

I should point out that the Pilates instructor that I was talking to was telling me about younger ballet dancers/students with curves between 30 and 40 degrees achieving a reduction. There's a difference between very large, mature curves and smaller, youthful, flexible curves. The purpose is not to just work around the scoliosis but to work with it.

If a person already had a fusion--like me--a good instructor must work "around" it rather than "with it" because certain Pilates movements are impossible or harmful in that case. If a person has an undisclosed/undiagnosed vertebral abnormality causing the scoliosis certain movements may also be painful and therefore harmful.

Pooka1
01-03-2011, 06:34 PM
If a person already had a fusion--like me--a good instructor must work "around" it rather than "with it" because certain Pilates movements are impossible or harmful in that case. If a person has an undisclosed/undiagnosed vertebral abnormality causing the scoliosis certain movements may also be painful and therefore harmful.

Moreover certain types of PT are contraindicated with certain connective tissue disorders. These disorders are relevant because some have scoliosis as a sign/symptom.

People should always ask an experienced orthopedic surgeon if any PT is okay for a person with scoliosis before starting it, whether for a child or an adult.

Last, Ask your orthopedic surgeon for whether there is any evidence that pilates has ever permanently reduced a structural scoliosis curve. Also ask how you can tell if a curve was not going to progress anyway even if doing no PT and how you can separate that out from the people whose curves stop progressing due to PT.

Remember that a majority of girls with smaller AIS curves will not progress to needing surgery for progression no matter what they do or don't do. Get the facts and don't get taken by someone with no relevant training and no way to prove any curve reduction like a pilates instructor.

Ballet Mom
01-03-2011, 09:31 PM
Obviously someone with a spinal fusion or someone with a genetic syndrome should be following carefully their doctors orders and asking if something is appropriate for them to do, but I was responding to a parent of a ballet student with a 25* curve.

For the other 98% of people with scoliosis, please look at what Dr. Orr of the Cleveland Clinic says:


Speaker_-_Dr__Douglas_Orr: There are no exercises that will cause damage to your spine or worsen your scoliosis. Exercises to strengthen your trunk muscles (commonly called core strengthening) are the most beneficial.

http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showthread.php?11133-Dr.-Orr-of-Cleveland-Clinic-Session-on-Adult-Scoliosis&

Whether or not any permanent curve reduction is made, if someone wants to do Pilates, it should help their well-being as it will increase their core strength. That's why American ballet dancers use it (Russian technique dancers typically get their core strength through their rigorous classes alone). And believe me, there are lots of professional ballet dancers with scoliosis doing Pilates for core strengthening.

If you wish to ask your doctors, by all means, but I think it's important that people with scoliosis don't consider themselves invalids that shouldn't do anything.

Resilience
01-04-2011, 09:19 AM
Thanks for the link. I like that doctor's way of thinking.

My daughter's pediatric scoliosis specialist, Dr Newton, has recommended exercise daily out of brace with the goal of keeping her core strong and countering the muscle atrophy that can occur with the TLSO.

I have been cleared by a spinal surgeon for full activity and am followed by a sports medicine physician who encourages stretching out my tight spots, core strengthening, pilates, yoga and massage.

I did a course of PT at Spine and Sport and learned about torso rotation from them. Out of all the exercises I learned there, this just feels the best to me.

This is just where I am coming from and just posting in case it's helpful to others.

Ballet Mom
01-04-2011, 09:28 AM
Thanks for the link. I like that doctor's way of thinking.

My daughter's pediatric scoliosis specialist, Dr Newton, has recommended exercise daily out of brace with the goal of keeping her core strong and countering the muscle atrophy that can occur with the TLSO.

I have been cleared by a spinal surgeon for full activity and am followed by a sports medicine physician who encourages stretching out my tight spots, core strengthening, pilates, yoga and massage.

I did a course of PT at Spine and Sport and learned about torso rotation from them. Out of all the exercises I learned there, this just feels the best to me.

This is just where I am coming from and just posting in case it's helpful to others.

Did Spine and Sport give you a way to do the torso rotation exercises without using the large equipment or do you have to visit their facility? And was your PT at Spine and Sport covered by insurance? Thanks for any info you can give on that, I'm curious if one can do those exercises effectively using therabands, for instance.

Resilience
01-05-2011, 12:47 AM
I did the Torso Rotation exercises at their PT site with their machine, a Cybex I believe, which was the BOMB! Felt great! Locked my legs in and had a top part that I hugged and twisted.

My gym has a torso rotation machine which is OK but not as great.

PT at Spine and Sport was covered by my insurance, Cigna PPO.

Since Dr. Mooney died some time ago, none of the current PTs actually knew him.

Pooka1
01-05-2011, 05:31 AM
Dr. Vert Mooney died in October, 2009.

http://www.spineuniverse.com/author/1578/mooney

cbiondillo
01-05-2011, 10:25 AM
Cheryl,

If your daughter's Pilates instructor hasn't figured out that your daughter has scoliosis on her own and knows how to work with it, she may not be the right person to achieve anything other than ballet strength training.

I should point out that the Pilates instructor that I was talking to was telling me about younger ballet dancers/students with curves between 30 and 40 degrees achieving a reduction. There's a difference between very large, mature curves and smaller, youthful, flexible curves. The purpose is not to just work around the scoliosis but to work with it.

That's another reason why I feel like I've been a bad mom. I was thinkiing about all of this and about my experience with my own scoliosis. When I had my surgery in 1980 I wasn't given the option to wear a brace. So, when I discovered that my daughter had it, too, I was just happy that she could avoid surgery by wearing the brace. I never questioned her doctor about his treatment plan for her. He said when she has 2 visits in a row where she doesn't grow, he will x-ray her wrist and see if her growth plate has closed. In the meantime, she has gotten more and more serious about ballet. I did ask her doctor if there was a connection between ballet dancers and scoliosis, although in my daughter's case, I believe it is hereditary. There have been 6 girls in her ballet company, that we know of, that have scoliosis. Is that a lot? I don't know. Does the flexibility that a ballet dancer has help or hurt the scoliosis? Her pilates teacher has her once a week in a class of about 20 girls. I feel bad that I haven't spoken with her teacher about the scoliosis. I plan to before the next class, that's for sure. We go back to the doctor on the Jan 20 for our next set of x-rays. When I look at my daughter, I see the scoliosis. I can see the right side of her back sticking out further than the left side. I wonder, though, do I see it because she's so darn skinny and has no body fat at all, or has it gotten worse?? I really hope it hasn't gotten worse.

cbiondillo
01-05-2011, 11:26 AM
Moreover certain types of PT are contraindicated with certain connective tissue disorders. These disorders are relevant because some have scoliosis as a sign/symptom.

People should always ask an experienced orthopedic surgeon if any PT is okay for a person with scoliosis before starting it, whether for a child or an adult.

Last, Ask your orthopedic surgeon for whether there is any evidence that pilates has ever permanently reduced a structural scoliosis curve. Also ask how you can tell if a curve was not going to progress anyway even if doing no PT and how you can separate that out from the people whose curves stop progressing due to PT.

Remember that a majority of girls with smaller AIS curves will not progress to needing surgery for progression no matter what they do or don't do. Get the facts and don't get taken by someone with no relevant training and no way to prove any curve reduction like a pilates instructor.

Those are good questions that I will ask my daugther's doctor.

I don't think her pilates teacher even knows about her scoliosis, so I'm pretty sure that the exercises she has my daughter doing, aren't meant to reduce the curve that she probably doesn't even know my daughter has. I'm going to talk with her teacher and her doctor about it.

Thanks!!

cbiondillo
01-05-2011, 11:29 AM
Thanks for the link. I like that doctor's way of thinking.

My daughter's pediatric scoliosis specialist, Dr Newton, has recommended exercise daily out of brace with the goal of keeping her core strong and countering the muscle atrophy that can occur with the TLSO.

I have been cleared by a spinal surgeon for full activity and am followed by a sports medicine physician who encourages stretching out my tight spots, core strengthening, pilates, yoga and massage.

I did a course of PT at Spine and Sport and learned about torso rotation from them. Out of all the exercises I learned there, this just feels the best to me.

This is just where I am coming from and just posting in case it's helpful to others.

Excuse my ignorance, but what is the TLSO?

Ballet Mom
01-05-2011, 05:51 PM
I did the Torso Rotation exercises at their PT site with their machine, a Cybex I believe, which was the BOMB! Felt great! Locked my legs in and had a top part that I hugged and twisted.

My gym has a torso rotation machine which is OK but not as great.

PT at Spine and Sport was covered by my insurance, Cigna PPO.

Since Dr. Mooney died some time ago, none of the current PTs actually knew him.

Thanks Resilience! Sounds like a great machine. Interesting that it's use is covered by your insurance. That's pretty nice!

Ballet Mom
01-05-2011, 06:04 PM
That's another reason why I feel like I've been a bad mom. I was thinkiing about all of this and about my experience with my own scoliosis. When I had my surgery in 1980 I wasn't given the option to wear a brace. So, when I discovered that my daughter had it, too, I was just happy that she could avoid surgery by wearing the brace. I never questioned her doctor about his treatment plan for her. He said when she has 2 visits in a row where she doesn't grow, he will x-ray her wrist and see if her growth plate has closed. In the meantime, she has gotten more and more serious about ballet. I did ask her doctor if there was a connection between ballet dancers and scoliosis, although in my daughter's case, I believe it is hereditary. There have been 6 girls in her ballet company, that we know of, that have scoliosis. Is that a lot? I don't know. Does the flexibility that a ballet dancer has help or hurt the scoliosis? Her pilates teacher has her once a week in a class of about 20 girls. I feel bad that I haven't spoken with her teacher about the scoliosis. I plan to before the next class, that's for sure. We go back to the doctor on the Jan 20 for our next set of x-rays. When I look at my daughter, I see the scoliosis. I can see the right side of her back sticking out further than the left side. I wonder, though, do I see it because she's so darn skinny and has no body fat at all, or has it gotten worse?? I really hope it hasn't gotten worse.

Stop thinking you're a bad mom. Really, who is going to question their doctor's treatment plan without digging deeply into the research? Not many people have time or willingness to do that. I think every parent goes through the guilt phase for not knowing about scoliosis, not catching it early enough, etc.

It actually sounds like your daughter's doctor has a pretty reasonable plan of action for her. I like the way he's planning to discontinue her brace. That gives a year of zero growth to help decide if she's done growing and then do an assessment of her skeletal growth. That seems rather reasonable to me, even though vertebral growth can continue after skeletal growth is complete in some instances. There's a thread in the research section if you're interested in looking at it.

If you want an exercise that probably has more direct effect on scoliosis, perhaps you can look into the sideshift exercises that are explained in the following link. She could do them while she's out of her brace, like when she's waiting around at ballet, etc. They seem to be pretty effective if performed consistently.

http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showthread.php?11651-Active-Correction-by-Sideshift-Exercises-as-described-by-Min-Mehta

Min Mehta is the doctor in Britain who developed the casting technique for infants, which can actually cure babies of their scoliosis! She's awesome.

Ballet Mom
01-05-2011, 06:42 PM
Oh, I forgot to answer your question about scoliosis in ballet companies. Scoliosis is very prevalent in professional ballet companies and rhythmic gymnastics. I think that's due to the collagen that allows for the hyperextension of the joints that is so valued in those activities. It seems that most girls who have hyperextended joints in serious ballet have some degree of scoliosis although most do not have to be braced because of it.

My daughter always tells me that she doesn't understand my interest in scoliosis because "everyone has it". lol.

cbiondillo
01-06-2011, 11:54 AM
Thank you for your help. I'll stop beating myself up now. I am interested in the side-shift exercises. Thanks for sending the link.

Resilience
01-07-2011, 12:45 AM
While exercising at the gym today I realized that the machine there is the Cybex machine. So the Torso Rotation Machine at Spine and Sport must have been called the MedEx machine. That's the one that was the Bomb! and the one cited in Dr. Mooney's studies.

This Ex, That Ex, I have a lot on my mind right now!!

Just wanted to be accurate on the post, sorry about that!

And TLSO stands for Thoracic Lumbar Sacral Orthotic aka Boston Brace.

skevimc
01-07-2011, 02:09 PM
Thanks for any info you can give on that, I'm curious if one can do those exercises effectively using therabands, for instance.

You can do the rotation exercise with a thera-band but you have to get a grey or gold band. I suppose black would work as well. The point being that it needs to offer enough resistance. Stick it in a door frame and get a stable chair that won't slide or roll across the floor. Then slide away from the door, i.e. stretching the theraband, sit in the chair, arms across your chest while gripping the t-band, and rotate. The important part with this is to make sure your hips remain stable. An exercise ball is good to sit on as well. If you have access to a bar stool type of chair, i.e. a seat that swivels but does not have wheels on it, is a good test for pelvic stabilization. Sitting on that chair, when you rotate, if you are moving your hips the chair will rotate with you.

I can further explain this if anyone is interested and this doesn't make sense.

Karen Ocker
01-07-2011, 02:46 PM
The last few posts are totally off topic(Pilates).

hdugger
01-07-2011, 02:53 PM
The last few posts are totally off topic(Pilates).

And, yet, oh so helpful. (Thanks to Dr. McIntire - actually just emailed his last post to my son.)

foofer
01-07-2011, 03:56 PM
You can do the rotation exercise with a thera-band but you have to get a grey or gold band. I suppose black would work as well. The point being that it needs to offer enough resistance. Stick it in a door frame and get a stable chair that won't slide or roll across the floor. Then slide away from the door, i.e. stretching the theraband, sit in the chair, arms across your chest while gripping the t-band, and rotate. The important part with this is to make sure your hips remain stable. An exercise ball is good to sit on as well. If you have access to a bar stool type of chair, i.e. a seat that swivels but does not have wheels on it, is a good test for pelvic stabilization. Sitting on that chair, when you rotate, if you are moving your hips the chair will rotate with you.

I can further explain this if anyone is interested and this doesn't make sense.

By sticking it in a door frame, do you mean looping it around the outside door knob and then closing the door, with the theraband coming through the crack in the door frame? The rest of it I get...

Hdugger...for neck and thoracic pain, my PT has me do a lot of standing rows with a theraband at home (or in the gym, but that's a couple miles away :)). I loop it around the banister and just do sets - it's barely any resistance but feels great...also I make sure my neck is pushed back and down, like you are trying to make the worst double chin ever, elongating the back of the neck to its max.

hdugger
01-07-2011, 03:58 PM
Thanks, foofer. I'll pass that on as well.

skevimc
01-07-2011, 04:48 PM
By sticking it in a door frame, do you mean looping it around the outside door knob and then closing the door, with the theraband coming through the crack in the door frame? The rest of it I get...



Either that or tying a knot at one end and putting it through the hinge side with the door open. Then when you close the door, it's locked in place. I usually told people to do it this way (hinge side). It just seems more stable to me. I got popped a couple times by a stretched band while trying to figure all of this out. Kind of funny.

foofer
01-07-2011, 05:56 PM
Either that or tying a knot at one end and putting it through the hinge side with the door open. Then when you close the door, it's locked in place. I usually told people to do it this way (hinge side). It just seems more stable to me. I got popped a couple times by a stretched band while trying to figure all of this out. Kind of funny.

Yeah, I've been wacked myself a time or two. And it is funny - kind of a slapstick pain.

Elisa
01-07-2011, 07:25 PM
I got popped a couple times by a stretched band while trying to figure all of this out. Kind of funny.

It was funny too when I fell off the hanging bar. Yes, we all must personally test out our great ideas; crash test dummies we are, haha!

foofer
01-07-2011, 10:14 PM
Several years back, I worked with a PT who specialized in Pilates* and at some point she took a video of me walking, my normal walk. Then she encouraged me to walk and hold myself with a lifting and shifting to the right in the lumbar area. I have a double major, typical with right thoracic hump and left lumbar. At first I felt like the Leaning Tower of Pisa, but the video showed a straighter posture. I'm thinking now that she had stumbled upon a form of side shifting. A couple questions: Is sideshifting a holding position, where I would try to hold myself in that posture as long as possible, or is it a pulsing exercise or a hold for 30 seconds- release- type of exercise? With double major, would I try to shift right in the lumbar area, shift left in thoracic? Sounds like a rhumba lesson...

Another exercise I was taught recently by a Yoga for Scoliosis instructor was to assume a yoga "Downward Dog" pose, and while doing so to focus on the thoracic area, breathe into the concave side (on me- the left) to try to open up those crowded ribs, and at the same time to squeeze the ribs of the convex side. The instructor has me imagining a set of eyes in the thoracic with one eye squinting in the convex and one eye opening wide in the concave. I had never much thought of the ribs and the narrowing and widening aspect. This feels very good for my body. Maybe someone here will find it helpful.

*Did anyone notice how artfully I knitted together the various subjects?

foofer
01-07-2011, 10:30 PM
Ah, I just did my own homework and read the Min Mehta description, which calls for holding the sideshift position for 10 seconds, then releasing...and doing this all throughout the day.

livingtwisted
01-07-2011, 11:30 PM
Another exercise I was taught recently by a Yoga for Scoliosis instructor was to assume a yoga "Downward Dog" pose, and while doing so to focus on the thoracic area, breathe into the concave side (on me- the left) to try to open up those crowded ribs, and at the same time to squeeze the ribs of the convex side. The instructor has me imagining a set of eyes in the thoracic with one eye squinting in the convex and one eye opening wide in the concave. I had never much thought of the ribs and the narrowing and widening aspect. This feels very good for my body. Maybe someone here will find it helpful.

This sounds like a variation on Schroth breathing. That's great that yoga instructors have picked up on that too! I've been to a few different yoga for scoliosis teachers and I don't remember them doing that. I wonder where your instructor learned it.

kidbusiness2
01-08-2011, 01:25 AM
THis is ALL very informative & helpful!!! TY for sharing! Please let me know of any other stretches you are doing for this! I do the downward dog position and then also the cat stretch upwards position *not sure that is the formal name* but hey they seem to work. Stretching always loosens me up and makes me feel a little better. Less pain the next day. Where or How do you find Instructors specializing with scoliosis patients?

livingtwisted
01-08-2011, 01:27 PM
Where or How do you find Instructors specializing with scoliosis patients?

Where do you live? I know of three for yoga (not sure if you meant yoga or pilates)...

Alice Plato in Los Angeles
Elise Miller in San Francisco (you can also get her DVD)
I can't remember the third's name, but she's in New York and I could try to dig it up if it's helpful (saw her only once when she was teaching a seminar for other instructors in Boston -- my regular yoga instructor brought me as a subject).

foofer
01-08-2011, 04:02 PM
I went to the Yoga Union Center for Backcare and Scoliosis the last time I visited NYC (my dad lives there). I took a couple classes and then scheduled a private lesson with one of the instructors. It was well worth the time and money; we worked on a few moves and I practice them at home. I had gone to see Dr Boachie when I first arrived, and he gave me the go-ahead on yoga, although I've been practicing on and off for a long while. When I worked with the instructor, I learned halfway through the lesson that she had been fused from about t4 to L2 when she was a teenager. I would not have guessed. I wish I could have such a place where I live, but it's also nice to be able to work on it at home.

Mehera, I don't know if this instructor was using Schroth breathing methods, but I would not be surprised. I was amazed by the students in that class. There were some very serious, extremely severe curves. Astounding. We were the Land of the Misfit Toys and I was hardly broken compared to most.

Ballet Mom
01-09-2011, 03:02 AM
Ah, I just did my own homework and read the Min Mehta description, which calls for holding the sideshift position for 10 seconds, then releasing...and doing this all throughout the day.

Actually, that's for growing kids to use to stop progression during their growth. For adult use, it's easier:

The side-shift has the advantage over other methods that it can be used as maintenance therapy to prevent progression in adult life. Five girls who are now skeletally mature (Risser 5) are maintaining their curves constant by a brief period of 15-30 minutes of side-shift daily.

Ballet Mom
01-09-2011, 03:26 AM
Where or How do you find Instructors specializing with scoliosis patients?

I would look for Pilates instructors who deal with ballet dancers (who tend to have a high rate of scoliosis). Looks for the Pilates programs associated with your local professional ballet companies or major pre-professional ballet schools. You could just give the local ballet company a call and some may inform you of who they work with.

Some show on their websites, such as Pacific Northwest Ballet, and you could then just talk to the instructors to see who has the most training and experience with scoliosis. You can also search on the internet for local Pilates and dance conditioning, and the ballet-related Pilates instructors pop up. You would of course have to talk to them to find out their scoliosis experience. Ask lots of questions.

Examples:

http://www.pnb.org/PNBSchool/PNBConditioning/#Instructors

http://www.longbeachdance.com/lbdc2009/instructorsstaff/marie-jose-blom-owner.html

You could probably call and talk to the people such as in the second link and she could probably refer people she knows or has trained. I'm guessing.

hdugger
01-09-2011, 11:31 AM
Actually, that's for growing kids to use to stop progression during their growth. For adult use, it's easier:

That's a really good point, Ballet Mom. The strong case for all of these exercise treatments, in my opinion, is during the period of slow progression - for small curves and for adults. It seems as if all of the focus of treatment is for holding curves during the growth spurt, but treatment is actually much more effective outside of that narrow window.

If you can hold a mature curve at 40 degrees, you could stop alot of pain and surgery in adults. I wish the researchers would get on that case.

scolio1964
01-30-2011, 12:10 AM
Does anyone know if doing Pilates while wearing a brace is harmful? My daughter takes a Pilates class once a week, but now that her back has progressed, we are trying to make sure she wears her brace as much as possible.

Thanks!!

LindaRacine
01-30-2011, 01:49 AM
Does anyone know if doing Pilates while wearing a brace is harmful? My daughter takes a Pilates class once a week, but now that her back has progressed, we are trying to make sure she wears her brace as much as possible.

Thanks!!
Hi...

It's very doubtful that it's harmful, but there's no proof one way or another. It might, however, not be helpful other than in keeping your daughter's core strong, which is probably helpful, no matter what the long-term natural history of your daughter's scoliosis.

Regards,
Lnda

mgs
01-30-2011, 10:53 AM
Linda, you were up late. I hope the noc wasn't a rough one. (sorry for hijack)