PDA

View Full Version : Need pre-op tips!



pilar
11-19-2010, 08:11 PM
Hi everyone,
so today I got a message from Dr. Pashman saying that my surgeries (ant-post) were moved up to Decemnber 6th and 10th!!! He wants to give me enough time to recuperate before I start school. Now, that's 2 weeks away!!! ahhhh! I have done nothing to prepare for this. What did you guys do??? Does excersicing everyday help, like hiking and walking? Did you change your diet or took vitamines? Any advice is greatly appreciated!

LisaB
11-19-2010, 08:32 PM
Exercise, especially anything cardiovascular, helps before surgery. I've always taken lots of vitamins and supplements but had to go off some (like fish oil and flaxseed oil) 2 weeks before surgery so call the office and check Monday. Also you're not supposed to take aspirin or ibuprofen before and after surgery, only Tylenol. So check with your doc right away. Good luck!

BadKitty
11-19-2010, 08:47 PM
Walking helped me; I was walking 2-3 miles a day already, and kept that up. Do core exercises, as strong abdominal and core muscles will help to stabilizing your spine after surgery. My doc told me what to take and not to take regarding supplements and vitamins, so ask your doc about that. I was surprised at the number of things that aren't allowed.

Other than that, be sure you have some loose clothing (sweat pants, shirts with wide necks) that will be easy to wear after surgery. You'll probably just wear hospital gowns until you go home, unless you go to rehab where you'll want to have real clothes. Everyone gets bloated, so having pants that aren't tight around the waist is critical. I also got a tip here about wearing camisoles instead of bras, and it worked great.

There is a wonderful list here on the forum somewhere, and I'll repost it if I can find it .. maybe someone else has the link?

You can also stock up on high-protein and healthy foods before your surgery. Having them already in the pantry when you get home will be helpful. Others have said putting things where you can easily reach them also is a good idea to do ahead of time.

jChris
11-19-2010, 09:23 PM
I purchased a couple of baskets that I placed on my bathroom dressing table to hold meds and other toiletries that were in my lower cabinets that I couldn't reach after surgery. It is handy to keep the things I use daily in these baskets so I don't have to bend.

I also keep a notepad where I can keep track of what medicines I have taken and when.

JenniferG
11-19-2010, 09:26 PM
What a nice man Dr. Pashman sounds. You are very lucky!

I got fit before my surgery but I wish I'd done squats. Because after surgery, (not immediately after) you do a lot of squatting, because you are not allowed to bend. So squats would be my recommendation, that and fast walking.

Best of luck Pilar!

titaniumed
11-19-2010, 09:51 PM
Its on Lindaís site.

http://www.scoliosislinks.com/PreparingforSurgery.htm

http://www.scoliosislinks.com/References.htm

Itís a great list.

BTW, I was totally unprepared....and I learned a few things, the hard way. lol

Having someone around to help out IS the most important thing. Having a support team of people that are close to you. Make sure they understand what is going to happen.

If I had to buy 1 thing, it would be the foam topper for the bed.
Ed

kennedy
11-20-2010, 11:25 AM
well before my spinal fusion i walk all the time
swimming is also a good idea before surgery.

Lilysaidwhat
01-16-2011, 09:06 AM
Sorry to bump an old thread but this is really useful information.

Ed, of the things you wish you'd bought early-on, was one of them a raised toilet seat? My bathroom upstairs has a walk-in shower, but there is nothing to hold on to for getting on or off the toilet, and I really would like to do that on my own as early as possible. Worth the money?

titaniumed
01-16-2011, 09:36 AM
Lily
The raised toilet seat subject has been brought up here many times. Some people like to have them, but I didnít have any problems toileting or showering....I didnít need one.

Its nice to prepare, but its also nice to have the insurance company provide items, after all, you are paying for it to begin with. They will give you items in the hospital they deem necessary....They gave me my walker, and my grabber.

The main thing is preparing all the people in your circle. Making sure you have a support system with someone that will help you when needed. I had that set-up, so didnít worry about the little things. You really need to concentrate on yourself, on healing, and shouldnít have to worry about anything else. You only have one shot at this.

Welcome to the forum
Ed

Lilysaidwhat
01-16-2011, 09:54 AM
Thanks Ed for the quick reply. We'll hold off on that - but will be buying a handheld shower once I get another coupon from Bed Bath and Beyond. Honestly, I'm not sure I will need that. I mean, if you're standing under the shower head it's pretty much going to get you rinsed off anyway, right?

Finally, regarding the foam topper. We have a select comfort bed (sleep number) - which I think will be really good as I can adjust it firmer or softer as it feels right.

I have a lot of flexibility in me, other than that 65* thoracic curve, of course - and should be able to squat down, etc., right? I am in excellent health otherwise, and am currently doing daily PT to strengthen abs and scapulars, and taking Calcium with Vit D and a multivitamin, as I've had trouble eating due to stress/anxiety.

Anything else pre-op you would recommend? Any guidance is appreciated.

titaniumed
01-16-2011, 11:21 AM
Yes, water does flow downhill. He-he

When you get older, you will see that you suddenly have all these items piling up, and you think to yourself, ďwhy do I keep buying all this stuff ?Ē Ok, at least its happening to me..... I have too much stuff!!! LOL Its insanity.....

Find a local source, (medical supply co) for the toilet device, and have that info written down just in case you need it. You can always have someone go get it for you after you come home. Do this with the foam topper, just in case.

Since you are in good shape, practice your squats.....you will be fine.

As far as the stress in all of this, its hard to avoid. Just remember that stress will not get you anywhere, its not worth it. Yes, there are meds to help deal with this, but after reading all the fine print....lol my best advice would be to breathe, and go run around the block.(Forrest Gump) Do they help? Do you want to enter the surgery with extra chemicals in your system? I wouldnít think so. Eating a balanced diet is pretty important, it builds the immune system. If meds deprive you of this, its best to rethink things through.

Keep reading and asking questions here....I try to follow, its hard cause my eyes are taking a dump....thatís the problem with successful scoliosis surgery, you find out that everything else is shot! LOL Iím happy no matter what happens.

Ed

Pooka1
01-16-2011, 11:36 AM
@Lilysaidwhat,

Just curious why your lumbar needs fusing also. The disparity between your T curve and L curve is more consistent with you just having a structural T curve requiring only a T fusion just based on my readings.

Did the surgeon explain why he is also fusing your lumbar? Did you get a second opinion?

Susie*Bee
01-16-2011, 01:18 PM
Lily-- They sent me home from the hospital with a raised toilet seat with handles (the one I used there) -- so Ed is right in saying to wait and see if insurance will foot the bill for one. And maybe you won't need one. I was very weak afterward, and the handles were very much needed to help push myself up. Also, I really required a shower seat for awhile, and so the hand-held shower wand was truly needed. I just couldn't have stood that long in the shower. Those items weren't something insurance bought-- my husband got them. Taking a shower wore me out-- I would have to go rest for awhile afterward! Fortunately that didn't last too long. :)

LindaRacine
01-16-2011, 01:20 PM
@Lilysaidwhat,

Just curious why your lumbar needs fusing also. The disparity between your T curve and L curve is more consistent with you just having a structural T curve requiring only a T fusion just based on my readings.

Did the surgeon explain why he is also fusing your lumbar? Did you get a second opinion?

Sharon....

While lumbar curves may not start out as structural, I think they almost always become structural in adulthood.

Regards,
Linda

Pooka1
01-16-2011, 03:57 PM
Sharon....

While lumbar curves may not start out as structural, I think they almost always become structural in adulthood.

Regards,
Linda

Wow. I must say I suspected that some might based on the length of fusions in the adult crowd versus that in the kids crowd on this forum but I assumed it was just a random thing.

Is that true for all structural T curves or just large ones? Do compensatory L curves become structural in adulthood under moderate T curves??? Wouldn't that be a reason to fuse all structural T curves before adulthood?? To save the lumbar???

Lilysaidwhat
01-16-2011, 05:24 PM
I have chronic pain which is all on the exterior of the lumbar curve and due to muscular fatigue and compensation associated with the upper curve. My lower curve has not changed since childhood, depending on who measures the xrays that day, but I have severe degeneration in my L1 and L2 - they look like one of those double lego kids' toys. I believe the fusion of the whole shebang is to try to reduce the pain and make the whole thing more stable.

Please understand that my knowledge of the human body is largely based on the electric game Operation. I'm not sure if they are going to relocate my breadbasket or fuse my funny bone during this surgery!

Pooka1
01-16-2011, 05:29 PM
I have chronic pain which is all on the exterior of the lumbar curve and due to muscular fatigue and compensation associated with the upper curve. My lower curve has not changed since childhood, depending on who measures the xrays that day, but I have severe degeneration in my L1 and L2 - they look like one of those double lego kids' toys. I believe the fusion of the whole shebang is to try to reduce the pain and make the whole thing more stable.

Please understand that my knowledge of the human body is largely based on the electric game Operation. I'm not sure if they are going to relocate my breadbasket or fuse my funny bone during this surgery!


I hope you stick around. I think you are contributing a lot to the group.

LindaRacine
01-16-2011, 05:44 PM
Wow. I must say I suspected that some might based on the length of fusions in the adult crowd versus that in the kids crowd on this forum but I assumed it was just a random thing.

Is that true for all structural T curves or just large ones? Do compensatory L curves become structural in adulthood under moderate T curves??? Wouldn't that be a reason to fuse all structural T curves before adulthood?? To save the lumbar???

I don't know the answer to that, but I'd guess it's just larger curves. Adults with smaller thoracic curves aren't typically patients. In fact, I can't remember ever seeing an adult with a small thoracic curve. (That is, I'm sure they exist, but they don't typically seek treatment.)