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View Full Version : First human embryonic stem cell treatment begins



Pooka1
10-16-2010, 11:30 AM
Hoping to help victims of spinal cord injury...

http://news.discovery.com/human/embryonic-stem-cells-trials.html

Science over superstition. The only way forward.

titaniumed
10-16-2010, 12:07 PM
Beautiful!

There are some things that are important, and then there are some things that I would consider a top priority. This is one of them.

Every day is a good day, today is a great day.
Thanks for posting this Sharon

Ed

foofer
10-16-2010, 11:21 PM
There are a couple of women in my town that have travelled to India for stem cell treatments. Thought you might like to read about one. She has a segment on her stem cell experiences and also a very recent post about "E-Legs", an exciting invention:

http://www.pursuit.amandaboxtel.com/

or this one- which should be checked out for the wheel chair racing animated woman in the header:

http://www.amandaboxtel.com/

Pooka1
10-17-2010, 08:26 AM
http://stemcells.nih.gov/info/health.asp


Pluripotent stem cells offer the possibility of a renewable source of replacement cells and tissues to treat a myriad of diseases, conditions, and disabilities including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, burns, heart disease, diabetes, and arthritis.

I think they will solve Type I diabetes in my brother's lifetime. I hope my mother lives to see that.

Anyone who isn't mad as hell that Amanda or anyone has to leave the US and go to a different country for this treatment isn't capable of having a modern, rational, intellectually honest conversation FULL STOP. There are real liabilities to certain modes of thought.

titaniumed
10-18-2010, 10:24 PM
Amy
Its neat to see that she has a sense of humor about racing around in a wheelchair. I helped engineer some of the equipment she uses, I wont mention names, but they are manufacturing offshore now, and I no longer consult for them anymore.

E-Legs is promising. I hope they develop it much farther.

Sharon
I cant get mad anymore about this matter. I think the best way to look at it is that things are moving forward. I lost my dad to ALS, so you know how I feel. Terminal diseases are unforgiving.

We can get "mad as hell" about many things, mainly global "think tanks" deciding policies about how to assemble the future "world orders" and how global policies play out....Remember Ross, "I can hear the sucking sound of jobs leaving the country" He was right.

I think that Amanda is lucky in a sense. If she were born much earlier, her hope that a cure would not exist. It was a little nerve wrecking for me to see that she became paralyzed skiing. I personally have taken many many hard crashes. Expert skiers donít fall often, but when we do, we break things. Maybe soon she wont have to fly 12 hours for treatment, and maybe soon that needed cure for diabetes will be found, here at home.

Ed