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Ballet Mom
08-06-2010, 01:40 AM
"There's no clear evidence that untreated scoliosis, or scoliosis treated with bracing or spinal fusion, will increase the risk of back pain or arthritis in the long term.

The younger a child, or the more she or he has to grow, the greater the risk of scoliosis progressing. After puberty and growth, curves less than 50 degrees are not likely to get worse. For this reason, the ultimate goal of scoliosis management is to keep curves under 50 degrees until the child has matured. Children with curves less than 50 degrees typically grow up into adults with no significant problems related to scoliosis."

http://www.ucsfbenioffchildrens.org/conditions/scoliosis/treatment.html

Gryffindor
08-06-2010, 09:29 AM
I guess my daughter is the exception to this finding.

All doctors have agreed that she's done growing due to her menses starting when she was 12. She's 14 now, almost 15.

What brought the scoliosis to our attention was pain. Very bad pain. When she was diagnosed her curves were T: 21 L: 36. Three months later they had progressed to: T: 36 L: 48. (Won't know what they are now until the end of the month, but if I had to guess: T: 48 L: 60+).

Perhaps hers is worse since there's a history of arthritis in our family (aging, not juvenile)?

Even with the curves listed above, she's having difficulty with breathing. It was also explained to us by her pediatrician that there are nerves that go straight down your back that control many things. If those nerves become irritated it can lead to a host of problems.

Lorraine 1966
08-07-2010, 06:35 AM
I can't really understand that either, as with me I have been told that one part of my pain is due to the discs below my fusion having to do a lot of the work for the discs that were actually fused. I guess we are are all different though.

Gryffindor, I am so very sorry that in not quite 3 years Cheyenne's curves have increased, and she is having trouble breathing. Dear oh dear it really is awful when we see our children ill, and in so much pain, bless her. I honestly think, hope and pray that there will be a wonderful ending to all this for you and your family. Please keep us up to date on her progress and of course on the 23rd of August you will have my prayers, best of luck to you all.

Regards and "hugs across the sea."
Lorraine.

Snoopy
08-07-2010, 07:01 PM
My daughter must be the exception to the rule as well. Her main Scoli curve was 36* at diagnosis and she was skeletally mature. It increased to 46* in about a year's time. We too have a family history of arthritis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). Her doctors believe that her Kyphosis and Scoliosis are caused by CMT, but Jamie's never agreed to be tested for it. So, maybe our kids are the exception to the rule because of underlying causes for their Scoli?

Mary Lou

Pooka1
08-07-2010, 09:32 PM
"There's no clear evidence that untreated scoliosis, or scoliosis treated with bracing or spinal fusion, will increase the risk of back pain or arthritis in the long term."

Given that everyone who lives long enough will get DDD (arthritis), this statement is a penetrating glimpse into the obvious as the percentage of folks who get DDD can't be more than 100%.

Also, ~85% of people will have back pain in their life. The question is do folks with treated or untreated scoliosis have more or worse back pain at younger ages than the general population..

rohrer01
08-07-2010, 11:32 PM
"There's no clear evidence that untreated scoliosis, or scoliosis treated with bracing or spinal fusion, will increase the risk of back pain or arthritis in the long term.

The younger a child, or the more she or he has to grow, the greater the risk of scoliosis progressing. After puberty and growth, curves less than 50 degrees are not likely to get worse. For this reason, the ultimate goal of scoliosis management is to keep curves under 50 degrees until the child has matured. Children with curves less than 50 degrees typically grow up into adults with no significant problems related to scoliosis."

http://www.ucsfbenioffchildrens.org/conditions/scoliosis/treatment.html

I am CLEARLY an acception to this rule. I am 41 years old and two years ago my curves were approximately 40* and 28*. Now they are 46* and 38*. I guess these "rules" are man's best guess, and as can be clearly seen aren't true for all people. Now, how to figure out how to "guess" who the rules apply to... Oh, wait! We have Scoliscore in the making! Not to hash up an old subject, but I think they ought to be giving that test to adults as well as children. What we think we know, we'd better rethink!;)

rohrer01
08-07-2010, 11:36 PM
Also, ~85% of people will have back pain in their life. The question is do folks with treated or untreated scoliosis have more or worse back pain at younger ages than the general population..

I think, at least in my case, mild back pain at age 8, moderately severe back pain at age 12, and severe back pain at age 16 is NOT normal. But then again everything doesn't relate to me (except in my own little world ;)). But my best guess is that most 12 year olds don't complain of back pain unless there is something wrong.

Ballet Mom
08-07-2010, 11:43 PM
Yes, I'm sorry to say the key words are "not likely". Unfortunately, there are exceptions. It is the world that orthopedic surgeons deal in, there are no absolutes. But I think it's very good news that most kids won't have to worry about progression or extra pain due to larger curves at full maturity. Hopefully over time, these surgeons and researchers will find out why some curves continue to progress and cause pain.