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rohrer01
06-08-2010, 08:45 AM
I was just wondering if anyone knows anything about hypokyphosis. I received a call from Dr. Hey in N.C. and he said that was a factor in the squishing of the heart and lungs. I have SEVERE hypokyphosis and was just wondering if anyone else has any knowledge or experience. I guess it is rather common for those of us with T curves. I was just wondering if this should be a major factor in my decision whether or not to have surgery. Thanks in advance for any thoughts.

LindaRacine
06-08-2010, 12:03 PM
You may want to do a search on kyphosis. In terms of a disorder, it's interchangeable with hypokyphosis.

jrnyc
06-08-2010, 12:31 PM
hi rohr
my report says i am "particularly hypokyphotic in the thoracic spine, but with good overall balance." i have some reduced lung power, but not alot...so i consider myself lucky...but i think my thoracic curve is smaller than yours...it is now 42 degrees, while larger lumbar curve of 62 gives me the problems...i know one can live with hyperkyphosis without problems, but i also know if the curve gets big enuf, the problems will show up...

how many surgeons think you should have surgery now...is Dr Hey the only one at the moment, or are there others?

jess

rohrer01
06-08-2010, 01:14 PM
I haven't seen or talked to any other surgeons, yet. I haven't even seen Dr. Hey and he never said he would recommend surgery. I wouldn't trust anyone who told me that without even seeing me. He did say that he has treated people like me in the past with fairly good results 80-90% success rate. He was the ONLY one so far to ever address my hypokyphosis, though. This area is painful for me, and when I went to the chiro and she would push on that area it made it worse. It would knock the wind out of me every time.

I tried searching, but I'll try again.

:)

jrnyc
06-08-2010, 01:22 PM
yes, i know...i dont let anyone press on it...and am very very careful when i do have massages...which isnt often anymore...
with the botox shots, my muscles cant spasm wherever the shots are...they used to bunch up and i'd get these big knots!
a surgeon who shall be nameless, when i first started looking, told me i had a "hunch back"..i said could you phrase that a little more medically!! :rolleyes:

hope you find some relief!

jess

hdugger
06-08-2010, 02:26 PM
You may want to do a search on kyphosis. In terms of a disorder, it's interchangeable with hypokyphosis.

Isn't hypokyphosis the reverse of what's normally called kyphosis? If kyphosis curves too much, I thought hypokyphosis curved too little.

rohrer01
06-08-2010, 02:38 PM
This is the most relevant information I could find.

http://www.ejbjs.org/cgi/content/abstract/87/9/1937

It appears that it is believed to be one of the four components that impair lung function. Although according to this study, some subjects had more lung function impairment than would be suggested by the severity of their scoliosis.

rohrer01
06-08-2010, 02:41 PM
hypo= below
kyphosis= bowing out

It is not enough curve outward where it should be, the opposite of hunchback. It can even turn into lordosis or a bending inward. It causes a hollow spot between my shoulder blades.

rohrer01
06-08-2010, 02:43 PM
hyper=above, too much

hyperkyphosis is the word for the overly rounded back.

LindaRacine
06-08-2010, 02:49 PM
Sorry, you're absolutely correct.

I think that too little kyphosis is usually not a problem unless the spine is unbalanced in the sagittal plane.

rohrer01
06-08-2010, 02:56 PM
Dr. Tribus told me that there is actually a reduction in lung function after a scoliosis surgery. How can this be if the surgeon is able to pull the spine away from the chest wall? I would think that having the spine pushing toward the sternum would tend to smash things in there. ???

hdugger
06-08-2010, 03:12 PM
Dr. Tribus told me that there is actually a reduction in lung function after a scoliosis surgery. How can this be if the surgeon is able to pull the spine away from the chest wall? I would think that having the spine pushing toward the sternum would tend to smash things in there. ???

I'd be interested in knowing the answer to this, as well. I had thought that it was related to anterior surgery, but it seems to be I've heard people without only posterior surgery talk about a reduction in lung function.

Confusedmom
06-08-2010, 09:25 PM
I've heard of reduced lung capacity in the context of:

1) thoracoplasty (removing the rib hump)
2) temporary--anesthesia related
3) anterior thoracic surgeries where a complication could be slight damage to the chest wall (but I thought this was becoming less common with more posterior-only surgeries for thoracic)

Evelyn

P.S.
Rohrer, it makes complete sense to me that hypokyphosis would cause heart/lung issues, as it seems logical that it would decrease the space for these organs. I would think that would be a primary consideration for surgery.

rohrer01
06-08-2010, 10:55 PM
That's what I thought, too. I just don't know what to do. I found a doc that I know will do the surgery and it scares the daylights out of me! I would have to travel out of state, as the one where I live won't do it. He says I'm in the surgical grey area. My curves are 46* upper thoracic and 38* lower thoracic. I might add that I'm 41 years old. I'm afraid if I wait until I'm older, the surgery will get more complicated.

Back-out
06-08-2010, 11:05 PM
That's what I thought, too. I just don't know what to do. I found a doc that I know will do the surgery and it scares the daylights out of me! I would have to travel out of state, as the one where I live won't do it. He says I'm in the surgical grey area. My curves are 46* upper thoracic and 38* lower thoracic. I might add that I'm 41 years old. I'm afraid if I wait until I'm older, the surgery will get more complicated.

How too true! :o

rohrer01
07-31-2010, 11:06 PM
rohrer, like me you have moderate thoratic scoliosis and hypokyphosis, which is a painfull combination. I cant understand why surgeons refuses to do surgery on people like us, when it decreases lung capacity. Maybe the reason is lack of knowledge?

I don't understand either. According to the National Scoliosis Foundation, the one sponsoring this forum, anything over 40* is considered a MAJOR curve. Just a point of interest, since that is commonly used as the "magic" number for surgery. Some surgeons use 50* as their "magic" number and yet others stick by 60* (my current doc uses 60*). This makes no sense, since we are not numbers. They need to take into consideration the "whole" person rather than just a cobb angle. I'll bet you can see an array of severity of disease within a group of people with a cobb of 40*. There are things to consider like rotation, span of vertebrae covered by the curve, curve location, etc. It seems as none of these things are even considered. In fact, at my last two appointments, my doctor never even actually looked at my back. His assistant did the exam with my clothes on! How much can you see there? There was absolutely NO lung function test done either. There was no bending test to measure rotation. It just wasn't a very thorough exam at all.

Back-out
07-31-2010, 11:30 PM
I don't understand either. According to the National Scoliosis Foundation, the one sponsoring this forum, anything over 40* is considered a MAJOR curve. Just a point of interest, since that is commonly used as the "magic" number for surgery. Some surgeons use 50* as their "magic" number and yet others stick by 60* (my current doc uses 60*). This makes no sense, since we are not numbers. They need to take into consideration the "whole" person rather than just a cobb angle. I'll bet you can see an array of severity of disease within a group of people with a cobb of 40*. There are things to consider like rotation, span of vertebrae covered by the curve, curve location, etc. It seems as none of these things are even considered. In fact, at my last two appointments, my doctor never even actually looked at my back. His assistant did the exam with my clothes on! How much can you see there? There was absolutely NO lung function test done either. There was no bending test to measure rotation. It just wasn't a very thorough exam at all.
Hmmm. Getting increasingly confused as the JHU doc reported my Cobb as 54 - just to make things good and muddied! Local hospital's been saying 44 deg for seven yrs, while all three docs in NYC said 60 degrees (independently). Note that all these discrepancies may be explainable by their all using different Xrays!

I had no idea that bending Xrays show rotation. No one said a word to me about this (had bending Xrays at JHU). Is this generally accepted as he way to check rotation??

In looking at other factors to decide about surgery, I'm deciding that the most determining thing for me is my congenital flat back condition. This creates sagittal imbalance much like what so many of my age cohorts have gotten only iatrogenically - that is, some thirty or so years after an instrumented fusion. Also, my lumbar kyphosis; it popped up out of no where a few years ago. Both those latter are getting worse and both create pain. They seen to exist independent of the lumbar Cobb, which in the grand scheme of things, may in fact, be relatively stable.

All these considerations are driving me nuts. Can't imagine seeing your doc and having him REFUSE surgery for me, if he too came up with a Cobb under 60 degrees like the one at JHU!?!

Sometimes I feel like flipping a coin. :(

jrnyc
07-31-2010, 11:42 PM
hey rohr
was that doctor you're referring to a surgeon? if so, i'd steer very clear of such a doctor!! i wouldn't expect general practitioners to necessarily know what to look for, but i sure would expect a surgeon to know!

i think in scoliosis, a cut off number is expected, or felt to be needed...part of their criteria...but the surgeons i've seen, and especially the one i would go with for surgery, considered all...including my "particularly hypokyphotic" situation, listhesis, etc...did lung function measurement, took bending Xrays (the "good" kind, laying down)and most especially pointed out how much my very degenerated discs are now causing a lot of my present pain...he also mentioned how much stenosis and arthritis were contributing...so i knew he was looking at all factors involved...every surgeon i've seen liked the idea of botox shots i get in thoracic area, and didnt want to start above T11, even though i questioned the future of needing surgery further up the spine at some point...

all in all, that doctor you saw sounds inadequate to the job needed!!

i also can never forget that surgery is NO guarantee of freedom from pain or lack of problems...thus, i hesitate...

hope you feel better
jess

rohrer01
08-01-2010, 03:02 AM
hey rohr
was that doctor you're referring to a surgeon? if so, i'd steer very clear of such a doctor!! i wouldn't expect general practitioners to necessarily know what to look for, but i sure would expect a surgeon to know!

i think in scoliosis, a cut off number is expected, or felt to be needed...part of their criteria...but the surgeons i've seen, and especially the one i would go with for surgery, considered all...including my "particularly hypokyphotic" situation, listhesis, etc...did lung function measurement, took bending Xrays (the "good" kind, laying down)and most especially pointed out how much my very degenerated discs are now causing a lot of my present pain...he also mentioned how much stenosis and arthritis were contributing...so i knew he was looking at all factors involved...every surgeon i've seen liked the idea of botox shots i get in thoracic area, and didnt want to start above T11, even though i questioned the future of needing surgery further up the spine at some point...

all in all, that doctor you saw sounds inadequate to the job needed!!

i also can never forget that surgery is NO guarantee of freedom from pain or lack of problems...thus, i hesitate...

hope you feel better
jess

This is the same SRS surgeon that I've been talking about. Don't want to mention his name again, for fear (the other nasty thread) of being legally libel for discrediting him on a public forum. He practices in Madison, WI. He was always really nice to me before. This last time he wasn't mean, but not too thorough, either.

rohrer01
08-02-2010, 06:39 PM
rohrer, if you didn't already know, here is some information I found out about kyfosis browsing an norwegian website today:

In the thoratic sagittal plane (T5-T12) kyphotic curvatures under 10 degrees (<10) is named hypokyfosis, while curvatures from 10 to 40 degrees (10-40) is named normokyfosis, and curvatures over 40 degrees (>40) is named hyperkyfosis.

The latest doctor to evaluate my x-rays said I had "severe" hypokyphosis. He did not give me a degree. I may even have a lordosis there as it sinks in pretty good. :confused:

jrnyc
08-03-2010, 10:28 AM
a "double c shaped spine??? is that what the X rays found, rohr?? i dont know what that looks like...? have you seen that X ray?


hope you feel better!

jess

rohrer01
08-03-2010, 01:11 PM
I've never heard of a double C-shaped spine. I can post my x-rays again. I'm having some trouble as the picture is too large from this computer. Let me see if I can copy if from the other thread. Unfortunately, I did not copy my side standing x-rays to my computer so you can not see the hypokyphosis I'm talking about.

I've been playing around with my computer and let's try this again!

rohrer01
08-03-2010, 01:12 PM
These x-rays were taken in March of this year. I can feel my body changing since then, and it doesn't feel for the better, unfortunately.:(

jrnyc
08-03-2010, 01:58 PM
well. rohr...that is kinda what i thought you had...i dont know what anyone means by "double c" curves!!

how does your neck feel...that doesnt look like it would be good...?

jess

rohrer01
08-03-2010, 02:28 PM
well. rohr...that is kinda what i thought you had...i dont know what anyone means by "double c" curves!!

how does your neck feel...that doesnt look like it would be good...?

jess

My neck hurts like @#$%^&*!!! No one seems to understand that because by the time I see the specialist, my dear PCP has my pain under control. Practically ALL of the doctors in my PCP's office have seen me where I can not turn my head in any direction. Oh, and getting that last bit out of a pop can? Impossible, even WITH the pain meds. I also have a LOT of rib pain and pain in that lower curve. :( Any kind of twisting is a no, no. I have to log roll to get out of bed. I have started sleeping in a hospital bed because it inclines and has mild vibration that seems to lull me to sleep like a car ride. Sleeping is separate bed from dear hubby doesn't do much for our married life. It really stinks. All I want is my life back to a reasonable degree. I know I'll never be totally pain free, but reasonably pain free to the point that an occaisional tylenol or ibuprofen will do.

I'm also wondering if my "inappropriate sinus tachycardia" or IST heart arrythmia isn't due to the lack of space in my chest wall. I read somewhere on here the other day, or maybe doing research on the internet, that severe hypokyphosis can cause exercise intolerance, which is the primary symptom of IST. My heart beats so rapidly because I can't catch my breath. I wonder if that's because I don't have room in there to expand my lungs enough to keep up with the oxygen demand during exercise? As I type this, I'm having some gnarly pain in my right rib cage. WOW, "gnarly". Does that date me or what? LOL :D

rohrer01
08-03-2010, 02:31 PM
One more unimportant thing. You know how people tend to hold a pillowcase under their chin when putting in the pillow? I can't do that. I can't hold anything under my chin. I keep trying, but I just can't do it. I used to be able to do that. Being in the medical profession for part of my short working life, I know that this is a big no, no. But I watched my mom do it the whole time I was growing up. I have to do it the nursing way. :o

rohrer01
08-03-2010, 02:32 PM
rohrer, if you didn't already know, here is some information I found out about kyphosis browsing an norwegian website today:

In the thoratic sagittal plane (T5-T12) kyphotic curvatures under 10 degrees (<10) is named hypokyphosis, while curvatures from 10 to 40 degrees (10-40) is named normokyphosis, and curvatures over 40 degrees (>40) is named hyperkyphosis.

The doctor that reviewed this x-ray said I had severe hypokyphosis. If you look at the x-ray, you can clearly see that it is 0* or less.

LindaRacine
08-03-2010, 02:35 PM
This is the same SRS surgeon that I've been talking about. Don't want to mention his name again, for fear (the other nasty thread) of being legally libel for discrediting him on a public forum. He practices in Madison, WI. He was always really nice to me before. This last time he wasn't mean, but not too thorough, either.

If you post only truthful statements, there is no need to worry about libel.

rohrer01
08-03-2010, 02:37 PM
Looking at my profile x-rays up close, it almost looks like there might be a mild spondolisthesis at about T-10. Does anyone else see that? I have a LOT of pain in that area, as it feels unstable.

rohrer01
08-03-2010, 02:40 PM
If you post only truthful statements, there is no need to worry about libel.

I'm not being untruthful, but I don't want to hurt his practice either. He seems to be a very nice man. I just had a bad visit with him. He was NEVER rude or unkind about the way he said things. He was just matter-of-fact, and I obviously did not meet his personal surgical criteria. He offered me no other solutions except to search things out for myself, which is what I'm doing. I really don't understand why others with my degree of pathology seem to have no trouble finding help and I hit road blocks at every turn. It is soooo frustrating!

LindaRacine
08-03-2010, 02:43 PM
Rohrer....

Two observations:

1) I don't see a lot of rotation in your thoracic spine. However, it looks like the file was taken A/P instead of P/A, which makes it more difficult to see the pedicles. But, your ribs also look like they're not deformed.

2) Do you have any lower back pain, or is it all in your mid or upper back?

--Linda

LindaRacine
08-03-2010, 02:55 PM
Looking at my profile x-rays up close, it almost looks like there might be a mild spondolisthesis at about T-10. Does anyone else see that? I have a LOT of pain in that area, as it feels unstable.

No, I definitely do not see a spondy.

jrnyc
08-03-2010, 03:50 PM
hey rohr
i aint no doctor...or surgeon...not trying to be...i had enough with work in education and addiction!!

but if i were you...i say this only as a patient with a good pain guy...besides good surgeon...no...great surgeon...but my pain guy doesnt quit on me...now, to me, with no medical training, the curve doesnt look big to my eyes, and i'd guess your pain is higher up vs more low down...but...i have 42 and 61 curves with all kinds of disc prpblems, listhesis, stenosis...i wont delineate each and every problem..just to say that my pain guy has his hands full with my spine!!! :rolleyes: never has he suggest implanting something in me to dispense medicine...nor would i trust such a device!!!

i am NOT trying to minimize your pain...many things hurt that may or may not show on an X ray...learned that with a hairline fracture in a tooth..didn't show til dentist opened the tooth up!!! What i am saying is i'd find myself a better pain guy...and not take any excuses from any of them...i didn't find a good one on the first try...believe me...took at least 4 tries!!

i still keep getting injections..even when they evaporate after a week or a month...i still dont give up on it...please remember, they could operate on you and leave you with as much of more pain as when you started!!!

hope you feel better and get out from under the pain for a while..

jess

rohrer01
08-03-2010, 03:54 PM
Rohrer....

Two observations:

1) I don't see a lot of rotation in your thoracic spine. However, it looks like the file was taken A/P instead of P/A, which makes it more difficult to see the pedicles. But, your ribs also look like they're not deformed.

2) Do you have any lower back pain, or is it all in your mid or upper back?

--Linda

1) The radiograph was taken with me standing with the machine behind me. If you were to actually look at me from behind, the apex of the top curve bends toward the left and and apex of the bottom curve bends toward the right. So the X-rays would have penetrated the posterior side of my body and left my body on the anterior side (I'm assuming that this is in fact a P/A film). This is a very unusual curve, since most thoracic curves are the typical "right thoracic". Mine is a left thoracic curve. I have a rib hump under my left shoulder blade, which makes it stick out, and another rib hump below my right shoulder blade.

2) I have pain throughout the entire spine from C-1 to sacrum. The most constant intense pain is in my neck which causes some pretty intense headaches at times. I have a substantial amount of pain in my thoracic spine and in the ribs themselves. At times I find it very difficult to breathe due to the pain in the intercostal muscles. I get pain in the sternum as well but usually only during bad flare-ups. I also get a LOT of muscle spasms under the scapulae. The lower back hurts due to mild degenerative disc disease in the L5/S1 disc. I told my pain doctor if this is how badly "mild" DDD hurts, I can't even imagine severe DDD. I could barely walk. I could not dress myself, I could not even lift the lid to the toilet seat! I had an epidural steroid injection for that, and what a relief!! I have only mild aching in the L-spine now. The spine in general hurts enough that I have to log-roll to get out of bed most mornings.

Since I'm back on the fentanyl, percocet, klonopin, and now gabapentin (I feel like a complete failure after how hard I worked to get "clean"), about the only thing I can do is keep doing my PT exercises. I am very religious about them and have chosen ones from all of my past PT experiences that cover every section of the spine and the core muscles. I am not able to do many of the exercises that I used to be able to do, due to nerve pain caused by them. I have also developed a sympathetic nerve response to the sever pain that I am in, in which I get swelling above many of the spinous processes. I started another thread for this topic. I guess my point is, is that I am doing all that I can possibly do non-surgically and it is not working. I'm finding it quite frustrating that others with similar degrees of pathology seem to be able to get help and no one in a position to help me seems to believe that I am at the level of pain that I am. Of course, with being doped up all the time, I can do things that most people can do. However, I do not like having to take medication if I don't need it. It would be one thing if I had a failed surgery and I needed the meds, but there are so many success stories where people say they are living pain free after their surgeries. I don't expect to be pain free, as there may be other things going on as well (I'm no spring chicken!), but I certainly would expect to cut down on the amount pain that I have and on the amount of drugs I require to function in day to day life.

rohrer01
08-03-2010, 03:58 PM
You can see the heart and stomach in the x-ray. That should orient you to the way in which I am standing. It is as if you are looking at me directly from behind.

jrnyc
08-03-2010, 04:01 PM
rohr
i am so sorry that you're in such pain...i know things can hurt whether they look like they "should" or not...i went through that with Lyme disease...a doctor at the great and wondrous Stonybrook Hosp :rolleyes: told me i didnt need pain meds because "Lyme just doesn't hurt that much" so i know what it is to be in pain and have others doubt you...

again, i would go to a better pain doctor...and try injections rather than more oral meds...

also, do you have written documentation from a doctor that says what has been tried with you already...? maybe bringing such a written statement to a surgeon might make a difference...??? just a suggestion...

also..have you tried botox injections for rib humps..my left one is helped greatly by those injections every 3-4 months...if your guy doesnt do them, i'd find one that did...i know not all do...i saw a pain guy in CT who doesnt do them...i changed doctors!!

jess

rohrer01
08-03-2010, 04:41 PM
rohr
i am so sorry that you're in such pain...i know things can hurt whether they look like they "should" or not...i went through that with Lyme disease...a doctor at the great and wondrous Stonybrook Hosp :rolleyes: told me i didnt need pain meds because "Lyme just doesn't hurt that much" so i know what it is to be in pain and have others doubt you...

again, i would go to a better pain doctor...and try injections rather than more oral meds...

also, do you have written documentation from a doctor that says what has been tried with you already...? maybe bringing such a written statement to a surgeon might make a difference...??? just a suggestion...

also..have you tried botox injections for rib humps..my left one is helped greatly by those injections every 3-4 months...if your guy doesnt do them, i'd find one that did...i know not all do...i saw a pain guy in CT who doesnt do them...i changed doctors!!

jess

Well for one very big thing, I am limited by my HMO as to which doctors I can see. The doctor in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation DOES do botox injections, just not on me. He's afraid that paralyzing the muscles around my spine will cause it to callapse, escpecially since just chiropractic adjustments did that much damage in just two years time. The thing with injections, is I don't know where to get them as the pain isn't always constant in one area as it was in the lower spine. I do get many muscle spasms under the scapulae and the left trapezius is pretty constant. But some of the other pain, such as the intercostal pain comes and goes. There is also the "bone" pain that I feel in my spine. I really don't know what they would do about that. I do worry about masking all of these symptoms up because, as you can clearly see from my x-ray, there isn't a whole lot of room in there for my heart and lungs. I have trouble taking deep breaths, especially when I'm flared up and I already have asthma and am prone to pneumonia. They symptoms of hypokyphosis also sound quite a bit like my "heart" problem. I'd really like to know and address the real issues at hand rather than masking them up. But, because of the insurance that I have, I may not have a choice unless I can find a way to come up with 1/2 a million dollars. :eek:

jrnyc
08-03-2010, 04:51 PM
well, i dont know anyone with a half a million dollars for their medical treatment! we got paid fairly well (after 22 years and several graduate degrees :rolleyes:) at the DOE in NYC..but not that well! :)social workers don't make that kind of money..not even in private practice! if anyone on forum has that kind of $$ to spend on medicine, they dont talk like it!

the botox shots i get aren't on or near my spine..they are in the muscles in thoracic area...to stop them from spasming...the epidurals, facet blocks, nerve ablation, sacroiliac joint injections, etc, are all quite safe (all steroids have side effects, but where the injections are placed is safe)..and all they CAN do is treat the symptoms!! that is all pain medication is doing...treating the pain symptoms...so i dont know about "masking" things...

doctors who wont try something that might help...even temporarily...as long as a patient is not allergic to that treatment...??? doesnt make sense to me...

i dont know what else to suggest to you..
jess

rohrer01
08-03-2010, 05:02 PM
well, i dont know anyone with a half a million dollars for their medicAL TREATMENT! we got paid fairly well (after 22 years and several graduate degrees :rolleyes:) at the DOE in NYC..but not that well! :)social workers don't make that kind of money..not even in private practice! if anyone on forum has that kind of $$ to spend on medicine, they dont talk like it!

the botox shots i get aren't on or near my spine..they are in the muscles in thoracic area...to stop them for spasming...the epidurals, facet blocks, nerve ablation, sacroiliac joint injections, etc, are all quite safe (all steroids have side effects, but where the injections are placed is safe)..and all they CAN do is treat the symptoms!! that is all pain medication is doing...treating the pain symptoms...so i dont know about "masking" things...

doctors who wont try something that might help...even temporarily...as long as a patient is not allergic to that treatment...??? doesnt make sense to me...

i dont know what else to suggest to you..
jess

I know. You are a great help. I don't know what else to suggest to me either. I am going to NC at the end of this month. I feel like this is my last chance. If I get the same opinion there, I will just have to resign to my fate of pain for the rest of my life. Believe me, I will do everything to fight it. It's just so hard that sometimes I just want to give up. I have too many people around me that love me for me to even be thinking like that. I just never saw myself as a 41 year old drug addict, and not by choice. I'm going broke on the meds and the co-pays. I'm starting to see the "senior" dilemma with either having money to pay for food or pay for drugs that they need. It's sad to see a system where people have to make that choice. I'm not there, yet. But if it keeps going this way it won't be long. My hubby doesn't want me to work because he's afraid of me having an episode. I've just found out that the school that is literally two blocks from my house is looking for substitute teachers. I've only subbed at the university level, so I don't know if I can handle the little monsters, I mean lovely little children, that are forced to be at school against their will.:D If I can't have my surgery, then I think I will give it a shot, not literally, but give it a go. LOL
Jess, you have given me a lot to ask the doctors about and for that I am truly thankful. You are a real blessing on this forum, as are many others. I'm still curious about the hypokyphosis and the IST. I really do wonder if they are related. hmmmm....:confused:

jrnyc
08-03-2010, 05:08 PM
good luck in NC! :)

J.