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golfnut
05-17-2010, 01:44 PM
I know I am a worrier and should just take things one day at a time after surgery, but . . . I am thinking about losing muscle tone after surgery since all I'll be able to do for a long time is to walk. I work out at the Y on a regular basis and have fairly decent abs., quads, biceps, etc. for my age. Can the muscles atrophy in one or two months and if so, have you eventually been able to get them back to where they were pre-surgery? When I'm in many of my classes, I keep thinking that many of the exercises will not be good for my fused back once I'm allowed to go back. I may have to do water
exerxises instead. I've avoided it now mainly because I don't want to be seen in a bathing suit in front of people I know (it doesn't bother me on vacation)

LeansLeft
05-17-2010, 01:59 PM
Karen,
I was about 180 pounds before surgery, very low body fat, and muscular from working out 5-6 days a week for 30 years or so. I weighed 155 when I left the hospital. My muscle mass is gone, and I was left feeling extremely weak. Doc says it's too early for even physical therapy and prescribes walking, which I can do well, but in the process I'm continuing to burn calories. All in all, I'd say this has been one of my biggest issues. So much so, that I doubt whether I did the right thing. Maybe if I had tried to put on a lot of weight before surgery?

Andrew

jesscv
05-17-2010, 02:45 PM
I was 112 lbs going into surgery (I was pretty muscular), and at three weeks post-op due to lack of eating, exercise, etc., I weighed 98 lbs!! And that was with the extra lbs of metal...haha. I am now a year post-op and weigh about what I did pre-op. Pilates has helped me a lot with regaining muscle definition and strength. I highly suggest it, as it's non-impact and doesn't jar the spine.

golfnut
05-17-2010, 03:37 PM
Andrew,
How long has it been since you're had surgery? I know there are limitations for a long time, but I sure hope to eventually get back to the things I love to do now.

LeansLeft
05-17-2010, 05:00 PM
Not quite six weeks. Some people think I'm impatient.

ShariMSU
05-17-2010, 05:38 PM
I too was very fit when I went into surgery. 5' 9" I was 136 lbs prior to surgery and went down to 124 lbs. post surgery. Lost most of my muscle especially in my legs. I look skeletal. Now that appetite is back I'm doing better. Legs get very sore and have a long way to go to develop. I kind of expected this though. I still recommend building leg muscle as legs have to do a lot of work after surgery. Put some weight on if you can too.

titaniumed
05-17-2010, 05:41 PM
Karen Andrew

I wouldnít worry about gaining back your muscles. I broke my shoulder 2 weeks prior to my scoli surgeries and in 8 months it looked like a toothpick. 6 months after I started pt, I was doing 20 pullups.

It will be a slow recovery, but in time, you will be fine. I took it easy till I was fused. I just didnít want to take any chances.
Ed

golfnut
05-18-2010, 05:07 PM
Thanks for your responses.

Ed, how long until you knew you were fused? I thought it would be a year. Surely, I will be able to at least use light weights with my arms (I hope) after a month or so. I know I shouldn't dwell on my golf game, but if I won't be able to put the twist into the swing for power, I hope I can at least build back my arm muscles. Ed, since you can do pullups, that is sure encouraging!

titaniumed
05-18-2010, 08:07 PM
Karen

Using BMP its 6 mos, otherwise its 12 mos. My surgeon told me I was fused around the 6 month mark.

For the first 2 months I only lifted a dinner plate. (With a light dinner, of course!) Then from 2-6 months I kept it under 10 lbs. At the supermarket, I would tell the baggers to keep it light!!! At 6 months I was given permission to lift 100 lbs. I laid low for 13 months, then started testing things out as far as lifting heavy weights or skiing. I had some delicate and extensive grafting work done down low and was nervous about pushing things.

It would be good to find out if Dr Lenke will use BMP on you. I was a candidate, its expensive stuff.

Until you are fused, I would be hesitant to do a forceful golf swing. You are not supposed to twist for awhile....

Evidence of fusion is already in my x-ray at about 4 weeks. Look for the vertical white lines in the L1-Pelvis area at the tips of the screws. I donít have a copy of my current x-rays, but it pretty much turns solid white after awhile.
BMP was used only in this area, and not above L1. (You might be able to zoom in) Healing starts immediately after surgery. See below.
Ed

Doodles
05-18-2010, 08:34 PM
I know Dr. Lenke usually uses it. At least he did on me. When I got the notes from surgery it also had the things ordered for surgery--including 12 tubes of the stuff. Super expensive too. Janet

golfnut
05-18-2010, 08:54 PM
Bring on the BMP.
I'm not even thinking about a full swing until I'm at least a year post op. I told my golfing friends today that I hope to walk along with them next summer and just drop a ball close to the green and then just chip and putt. It will kill me not to play, but I figure just being on the course with my friends and walking is better than nothing. Thanks, again, to all of you who give such good advice. It's such a scarey surgery, but it sure helps to talk to those of you who have already gone through it. I know it won't be easy. I keep trying to prepare myself and my husband!

Back-out
05-18-2010, 10:10 PM
LeansLeft,

I am VERY sympathetic as a later post will describe in more detail. Meanwhile, after re-reading your concern about losing conditioning for the Nth time, I had a thought - forgive me if it's so obvious it is irritating (I know how frustrating it can be when someone comes up with a "solution" which you thought of eons ago! :rolleyes:)

There's weight and there's weight, You've lost muscle mass if you had almost no body fat before (and I KNOW how hard it is to achieve that), so the suggestions to have put on weight before surgery seem worse than pointless. Fat, especially in the wrong places, can be outright dangerous.

But if you're actually concerned about being told to engage in cardio exercise alone (walking) and thus losing still more muscle mass - now DOES seem to be a good time to work at keeping up the calorie intake you need. Enough to at least match your metabolic burn off.

I know that for the lean among us, gaining can be as hard as losing is for the rest of us . If you really want to avoid losing more muscle mass, though, surely you can force yourself to swallow those hi calorie bulking shakes or something equivalent.

Then, at least, you're not losing what muscles mass remains while exercising! It's so important to keep up your morale, too - and this will also help with that.

It must be so dismal to look in the mirror and see reflected a shadow of yourself after all those decades of hard won definition and buff! This will minimize that. You just need to be careful to balance the input and output in calories. Surely, if you've been a fitness devote so long, you can manage that. Then before you know it, you'll be allowed to work on Pilates, isometrics, stationary biking and upper body toning, to regain your definition.

I'm with you. This is of considerable concern to me too.

Radiogirl
05-18-2010, 10:33 PM
Ed, Lenke used BMP on me too. Did your insurance cover it? I am wondering about that. Also where did you find a cost breakdown of the surgery? I haven't had my first post op appt yet, maybe I will get this info then?

joyfull
05-18-2010, 11:13 PM
What is BMP?

titaniumed
05-19-2010, 01:20 AM
here you go

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_Morphogenic_Proteins
https://www.infusebonegraft.com/bone_morphogenetic_proteins.html
https://www.infusebonegraft.com/how_infuse_works.html

Ed

rohrer01
05-19-2010, 07:58 AM
Bring on the BMP.
I'm not even thinking about a full swing until I'm at least a year post op. I told my golfing friends today that I hope to walk along with them next summer and just drop a ball close to the green and then just chip and putt. It will kill me not to play, but I figure just being on the course with my friends and walking is better than nothing. Thanks, again, to all of you who give such good advice. It's such a scarey surgery, but it sure helps to talk to those of you who have already gone through it. I know it won't be easy. I keep trying to prepare myself and my husband!

Golfnut, go to the Scoliosis Research Society home page and read about their poster girl. She is a professional golfer. It might give you some inspiration. :)