PDA

View Full Version : this is a statement from Quackwatch...do you agree?



Bigbluefrog
05-09-2010, 06:00 PM
Scoliosis: A Sensible Approach
Mark S. Rosenthal, M.D.

There are several types of scoliosis. Fortunately, most are rare. The common type is "idiopathic scoliosis," so called because the cause is unknown. It affects about 4% of the population, but is more common among females. Idiopathic scoliosis usually starts between the ages of 10 and 12. As the child grows, there is a chance the curve can progress (worsen). Most curves will not worsen during adolescence and worsening after growth is complete is unusual.

http://www.quackwatch.org/03HealthPromotion/scoliosis.html

Would you agree with that statement? It also states after adulthood you have less chance for progression...I find these statement to be hopeful but not true from what I have read on this forums.

Bigbluefrog
05-09-2010, 06:07 PM
Will Adolescent Scoliosis keep progressing?

When growth is complete, curves under 30 degrees usually donít get any worse. Bracing for curves that reach 30 degrees to prevent them from getting worse during the growing years is essential. Bracing is usually ineffective for curves over 45 degrees. Curves over 45 - 50 degrees almost always keep progressing and usually require surgery. Spinal fusion surgery halts the progression of the curve and greatly reduces existing deformity. Spinal fusion involves fusing two or more vertebrae of the spine together by surgery.

http://www.bigbackpain.com/scoliosis.html

It is a jungle of information out there...you really need to weed through facts and understand that so many variables are involved.

please do share any reliable source for information on scoliosis

Pooka1
05-09-2010, 07:27 PM
Most curves will not worsen during adolescence and worsening after growth is complete is unusual.
http://www.quackwatch.org/03HealthPromotion/scoliosis.html

Would you agree with that statement? It also states after adulthood you have less chance for progression...I find these statement to be hopeful but not true from what I have read on this forums.

I would not agree or disagree until I see some high quality data. I haven't seen any yet.

There is an alarming number of testimonials just on the last year or so with people well below surgical range at maturity nevertheless still reaching surgical range as young adults not to mention in middle age.

And we have at least one experienced surgeon stating it is not unusual for that patient with a mid 30* curve at maturity to reach surgical range in young adulthood. That was even more alarming to hear. I am very sure every single parent and patient would assume at this point that if they made it to the mid 30* at maturity they would never need fusion for progression. I know my kid thought that and so did I. And I would bet a lot of money our surgeon thinks that based on what he has told us.

So it seems there is some disagreement building on this point.

Still, the testimonials here are not a random sampling and it could very well be that these are literally a few in a thousand (or more) that progress despite being in the putatively safe zone.

rohrer01
05-09-2010, 08:29 PM
Scoliosis: A Sensible Approach
Mark S. Rosenthal, M.D.

There are several types of scoliosis. Fortunately, most are rare. The common type is "idiopathic scoliosis," so called because the cause is unknown. It affects about 4% of the population, but is more common among females. Idiopathic scoliosis usually starts between the ages of 10 and 12. As the child grows, there is a chance the curve can progress (worsen). Most curves will not worsen during adolescence and worsening after growth is complete is unusual.

http://www.quackwatch.org/03HealthPromotion/scoliosis.html

Would you agree with that statement? It also states after adulthood you have less chance for progression...I find these statement to be hopeful but not true from what I have read on this forums.

My best statement would be that for some people this is true. I was diagnosed at 16 with an unbracable 39* upper thoracic curve. It improved with some therapies that I was subjected to and it was stable for over 20 years. I am 41 years old and have progressed to 46* over the last 2 years. So it goes, no one can say for certainty. You are in the brace, your curves are small. I would be as compliant as you possibly can be. Do what the doctors tell you. Be smart and keep up on your own research, like you are doing, so that you know what the best treatment options are. You are an intelligent young woman. I wish I had been as smart as you when I was first diagnosed. But again, we didn't have the internet back then. :eek:

dailystrength
05-10-2010, 08:35 PM
As far as my own experience, which is the only I can speak for, I was "discovered" at age 15 at 34L, braced 1 year with a result to 19L (and man did I pay for that in pain!), and then.................. age 35 I was 34L again, and then at age 43, 49L. Keep a close eye. I have managed to reverse my curve to 45L thru various means--see my thread "Result of Dr visit.

diane2628
05-12-2010, 10:00 PM
I think this is true. But you have to think about what he's really saying. Of all people with scoliosis, most people have mild cases - most people don't need to be treated at all, because their curves are minor and cause them no problems. The percentage of people who have scoliosis who have more significant curves is smaller - they're certainly a minority of all scoliosis cases, otherwise every teenager with scoli would be in a brace. Mild cases don't tend to progress after adolescence. So in that sense, it is true - most people have mild cases, and most mild cases don't progress in adulthood.

But from what I understand, the more severe the curve is, the more likely it is to progress into adulthood. My doctor told me when I was a teen (when I wore a brace) that the 'tipping point' was usually either 30 or 40 degrees (I can't remember which it is)...if your curves are beyond that point, they're more likely to progress. It won't always happen, but it's more likely.

diane2628
05-12-2010, 10:05 PM
"Spinal fusion surgery halts the progression of the curve and greatly reduces existing deformity."

I'm not as sure about this statement. There are definitely people who still progress after surgery - not much, and I think it's rare, but that definitely happens sometimes. Surgery stops it - but not always forever.

I still think the earlier post is true, though. Most adolescents with minor curves don't progress. It's not a guarantee, but odds are better that it won't progress in adulthood if the curves are smaller.