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fandango
04-21-2010, 06:07 AM
Hi all,
Can anyone tell me what the difference is between Idiopathic and Scheurmanns kyphosis. I thought that Scheurmanns was distinguished by having wedge shaped vertebrae. I have wedge shaped vertebrae, but I reread my letter from the consultant last night and it says I have Idiopathic Kyphosis.

I have only began reading about surgeries and as I understand it, you are more likely to get junctional kyphosis following surgery with Scheurmanns (even exclusively). Is this true?

Thanks for your help in anticipation

Snoopy
04-21-2010, 06:38 AM
Hi,

Sorry, I don't know the difference between Idiopathic and Scheurmann's Kyphosis.

I'm not sure if you are more likely to have junctional Kyphosis with Scheurmann's, but my daughter has Ideopathic Kyphosis (and Scoliosis) and she developed junctional Kyphosis after her surgery.

Mary Lou

LindaRacine
04-21-2010, 03:33 PM
Hi all,
Can anyone tell me what the difference is between Idiopathic and Scheurmanns kyphosis. I thought that Scheurmanns was distinguished by having wedge shaped vertebrae. I have wedge shaped vertebrae, but I reread my letter from the consultant last night and it says I have Idiopathic Kyphosis.

I have only began reading about surgeries and as I understand it, you are more likely to get junctional kyphosis following surgery with Scheurmanns (even exclusively). Is this true?

Thanks for your help in anticipation

Hi...

My understanding is that Scheuermann's is idiopathic. It's defined by wedge-shaped vertebrae, but the cause of the wedging is unknown.

--Linda

hdugger
04-21-2010, 04:18 PM
Hi Fandango,

My son has non-Scheurmanns kyphosis, and my understanding has been that if you have any kind of kyphosis, you're more at risk for junctional kyphosis.

Here are some of the risk factors:

"The PJK-inducing factors included greater than 10 degrees intraoperative decrease in thoracic kyphosis, thoracoplasty, the use of a pedicle screw at the top vertebra, autogenous bone graft and fusion to the lower lumbar vertebra" from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20106476

And, I can't find the other paper I had on the topic, but that one said that the risk is higher in men.

hdugger
04-21-2010, 04:45 PM
Ah, here's the other one.

Summary: "CONCLUSION: Two-year postoperative PJK prevalence in AIS following 3 different posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion surgeries was 27%. A larger preoperative thoracic kyphosis angle, greater immediate postoperative thoracic kyphosis angle decrease, thoracoplasty, and male sex correlated significantly with PJK. There were no significant differences in Scoliosis Research Society Patient Questionnaire-24 outcome-scores between the PJK and non-PJK group."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18007253

fandango
04-22-2010, 07:39 AM
wow! that sounds like a high percentage of people get junctional kyphosis. So those people then need revision surgeries to extend the fusion? And then..?

Snoopy
04-22-2010, 01:56 PM
Surgery was recommended for my daughter to extend her fusion, but we decided to watch and wait. Thankfully her Kyphosis has not increased. And we pray that over time it won't increase.

Mary Lou