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flerc
04-09-2010, 01:39 PM
I agree with the idea that surely does not exist a doctor in the World being able to respond that question, so if we want to know it, we must to elaborate the answer by ourselves.
We should to know the fundamental facts, but as doctors dont give so much help for that, we must to assume its.
Surely Im wrong and I hope that for some of that points, but I must to believe in something to know what to do, so

I suppose that:
1) If muscles in the convex side could be not to short, there not exists a terrific vertebral or intervertebral wedge, rotation could be decreased, ligaments could be not so weak, internal organs, fascias, and all that could be considered as something like the pneumatic skeleton could be not collapsed, specifics muscles are not so weak, the neuromuscular and balance (vestibular..) system could be adapted to a new posture, (there should not exist structural problems as length extremities..), then we could be sure that some significant degrees could be reduced in a permanent way.
What means for me a permanent way? For telling that in a short way, it means that reduction would remains without any kind of maintenance if wed live in the moon.

2) There exist some specific therapies for keep the muscles not so short or weak, others for avoid the collapse of the pneumatic skeleton and many others for the neuromuscular and balance system and for correct structural problems too.
3) It seems to exist so few therapies or products dealing with ligaments and pneumatic skeleton.
4) It seems to exist so fewer therapies or products dealing with the recovery of the interbertebral space.
5) It seems to not exist any therapy or product dealing with the recovery of the vertebras.
6) It seems so difficult that if a factor fails, the other factors could be improved in a so amazing way, that a permanent reduction could be reached any way. For instance, if intervertebral space wedge, could not be reduced, even if specific muscles are improved the most that could be improved in its strength and length, a permanent reduction could not be reached.

I conclude that:

1) It seems to be impossible to reach a permanent reduction of some significant degrees if a terrific vertebral wedge exists.
2) Even if it is not the case, every therapy or conservative method that promises a permanent reduction, should to explain, how it could recover the intervertebral space.
3) If they do not do that, surely they should to be seen as charlatans.

Any kind of comment would be appreciated

Pooka1
04-09-2010, 02:07 PM
I conclude that:

1) It seems to be impossible to reach a permanent reduction of some significant degrees if a terrific vertebral wedge exists.
2) Even if it is not the case, every therapy or conservative method that promises a permanent reduction, should to explain, how it could recover the intervertebral space.
3) If they do not do that, surely they should to be seen as charlatans.

Any kind of comment would be appreciated

S estoy completamente de acuerdo. Pensar bien.

Surgeons can change the shape of the vertebrae (wedge osteotomies) but I don't know when they use that procedure. They don't seem to use it on children as far as I can tell.

Saludos a mi buen amigo. :)

flerc
04-09-2010, 06:40 PM
Sharon!, que tal? Espero que muy bien vos y tus gemelas.
There also exist in Spain a surgery technique that replace the intervertebral discs with artificial ones. The technology is really incredible.

Un gran abrazo y hasta pronto!

flerc
06-04-2010, 09:11 AM
Of course it would be great for me to get some guess.

7) Flexibility is the only choice to reduce degrees. Of course joints need to be able to move toward the convex side.
8) Flexibility is a necessary condition but not an enough one. By itself might not keep the spine straight.
9) Rigidity works against the gravity force. Obviously is the only way the joints may offer resistance.
10) Rigidity avoids the possibility to reduce degrees and by itself is not enough to avoid progression.
11) Rigidity (as the surgeon said me) could lead to pain.
12) Is impossible decompress the discs without stretching the spine.
13) Discs can not be regenerated without decompression.
14) Discs can not recover some of her lost height in the concave side if some kind of regeneration is not done.
15) These are the only ways to keep a spine straight with unrecovered discs, while some of this is done:
a) Lying on a hard surface like the ground (especially over the concave side).
b) Doing some kind of exercises (alone or with a machine) stretching the spine.
c) Using a brace adapted to the straight spine. Any kind of brace? SpineCore could be adapted? It’s a great mystery (at least for me).
d) VBS? Surely another great mystery too.