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JamieAnn
04-08-2010, 10:53 AM
Hi Everyone,

It's been a while since I've been on the forum :). I just came from my appointment with Dr. Errico in NYC, and need some advice!

I used to see Dr. Schwab, also in NY, and had to switch this year due to my insurance changing. I've heard great things about both so I wanted the second opinion anyway.

My curve seems to be progressing at an average speed. It was in the low 30's when I was a teenager, now I'm 29 years old and it's around 46 degrees. Dr. Schwab had said a few years ago that it will probably continue to get worse, and today Dr. Errico said he would recommend surgery.

I really appreciated the time he took with me, but somehow I feel like there isn't enough time to spend talking about this surgery to feel comfortable. He was pretty laid back about the idea of surgery, kinda like it was no big deal. He was also very honest in saying that it's 100% my choice, and I can do this at any time but earlier is obviously better due to my age and flexbility of my spine.

Does anyone have any advice, being in a similar situation? Now that I've officially gotten a green light from a specialist, I feel like I really need to start thinking seriously about this and make some decisions. I feel like everyone else in my life doesn't get this at all - some think I'm being overly dramatic, some think I should run out and do this.

Help? :confused:

Thanks everyone,
Jamie

JenM
04-08-2010, 11:36 AM
Hi JamieAnn-

Wow, your post really sounds similar to my situation. I am 31 years old and I am currently scheduled for surgery with Dr. Boachie in NYC at the Hospital for Special Surgery on June 8. When I was around 15, my curves were in their mid thirites, then when I was around 25 years old they were both 48 degrees. Well, then I went on to have a child at both 26 and 28 years old, and that's when the pain got terrible and my curves really increased. I am now 31 years old and my thoracic curve is 55 degrees and my lumbar curve is 58 degrees. Like you, no one I know in my family really takes my situation seriously. I think my parents all think I'm crazy because I am scheduled for surgery. My grandma lived with a double curvature in the 100 degree range her whole life, but I'm not going to do that. I think they think since she did that, then I can do it. I went to see numerous doctors throughout the years about surgery, and none of them told me straight out to do it. They just told me to come back in a few years to measure the curves again. They say it's 100% my choice, and that it's no rush. Well Dr. Boachie in November recommended that I do the surgery, so I booked it. Also, let me tell you, I believe if your curves are in the upper 40's now, like mine were when I was your age a few years ago, that after you have kids they will most probably continue to increase.

Anyway, I wish you the best of luck in whatever you decide. I am really scared to death of the surgery, but I am moving forward with it. It's only 8 weeks away!

Keep us posted on what you decide!

Take care,
JenM

jrnyc
04-08-2010, 02:31 PM
Hi Jamie
Dr Errico was once listed in NY Magazine as one of the best orthopedic surgeons in NYC...i know his waiting room used to be packed! to such busy surgeons...well, it is a routine thing to them...or at least, a heck of a lot more routine than it ever is to the patient!
i am mulling over surgery...but want to wait til someone who does the newer minimal invasive for lumbar region AND takes my insurance is available...i see Dr Lonner in NYC april 12th...this monday...to discuss it...i had the consult in L.A. in January 2010 for the minimal invasive for lumbar......that doctor does not take my insurance...but i like the method...no muscle cutting! but...i am waaay older than you are....that is a factor....absolutely! AND...at your age, i think your curve is kinda large...mine didnt get into the 40's til i was in my 40's (seriously)

did they tell you what levels you need fused? how much pain are you in....????

it is a really big decision for anyone to make...cause it is not like you can change your mind later!! it is very hard for me to consider fusion to pelvis...i fear the loss of flexibility...despite many people on forum telling me it is not as bad as one imagines....i have alot of flexibility right now..no strength and lots of pain, though! :rolleyes:

best of luck with your decision...

jess

JamieAnn
04-08-2010, 02:59 PM
Thank you both for your advice! It's so helpful to hear that people are really in the same position as me, especially when it comes to having to make the decision myself.

Jen, best of luck in your upcoming surgery. I look forward to hearing about your progress!

Thanks again,
Jamie

ddb
04-08-2010, 03:33 PM
Hi JamieAnn - I have two dd's both with scoliosis. Your not alone with these hard decisions. It really helped me to discuss some of the hard things here.

My younger dd's lumbar cruve progress fast into the 50's and just had surgery this past Feb.

My oldest (now 19) has the same curve -in the 40's, but also has kyphosis. She wants surgery now to fix this because she knows (and drs. have said) it will continue to progress and will eventually need surgery. She wants go get it over with now before she has a career and family that needs her. Funny when the dr. told her she had scoliosis she refused to believe them, even though it was obvious to me by looking at her - she didn't see it. Well she is not at the magic number of 50*, so is working with PT to help her muscle spasms and back pain(finished today). We will see from here what the surgeon say.

This forum has a wealth of knowledge, and people who have been there and don't mind coming back to help those who are still going though this.

Best of luck to you while you search out your best options.

Dee

titaniumed
04-09-2010, 02:32 AM
Hi JamieAnn

Making that decision is so tough, it took me 34 years!....I had twin 50s back when I was 16, and was a candidate in 1974.

There are so many parameters involved in decision making, but the main one would be pain.

How is your pain?

If you can manage your pain, you might be able to wait on this. You can always do this later.

I say this because you are 31 years old. If you were 15-20 years older and had pain, the decision would be much easier.

Ed

Pooka1
04-09-2010, 05:42 AM
Did anyone else notice that there are two people on this thread, one in the low 30s* and one in the mid 30s* at maturity who reached surgery territory at young ages? And they join the others who have posted who were clearly subsurgically at maturity but nevertheless had progression requiring surgery.

How many kids here are valiantly wearing braces hoping to make it to maturity with curves in the low to mid 30s* and then thinking they have escaped surgery? I know my kid certainly thought that if she stayed that low she would escape surgery. Yet another reason for me to regret her year of brace wear.

Now this tiny sandbox is not a representative sample and maybe most people at mid 30s* or below do not go on to need fusion for progression but how many go on to need fusion for associated damage brought on or accelerated from having a curve in the low to mid 30s*? In other words, even if bracing changes the natural progression rate of scoliosis during growth, does bracing only delay rather than avoid surgery? I think if it is the vast majority then folks need to know that especially if the long term surgical outcome is statistically different between spine with damage and those without.

JamieAnn
04-09-2010, 10:26 AM
Dr. Errico commented on that, that sometimes curves do NOT progress past the 30*'s. I mentioned that when I was 16 my doctor sent me on my merry way, and here I am 14 years later considering surgery.

To answer the question re: pain, I have stiffness and soreness all over, with some particular spots within my muscles that I feel are being pushed/pulled awkwardly. At this time I don't feel pain alone would force me to do surgery, but it's more a combination of future potential pain and not wanting increased deformity overall. I'm already pretty frustrated with how crooked I am, I couldn't imagine 20 years from now.

I'm wondering what holds us back from not having surgery? If I can afford time off from work, I'm at the right age and don't have kids yet (but would like them 2-3 years from now) why wouldn't I go for it? I'm very scared of the surgery and feel it's a huge decision, but I am trying to find the downsides of why i would hold off when my body is in the best condition now.

Pooka1
04-09-2010, 10:38 AM
Dr. Errico commented on that, that sometimes curves do NOT progress past the 30*'s. I mentioned that when I was 16 my doctor sent me on my merry way, and here I am 14 years later considering surgery.

Wow did he really say it that way implying that many curves DO progress starting from the 30s* at maturity?

If so that is a significant change in the paradigm which holds that anything below 40* - 50* at maturity is your ticket off the surgery table.

I think someone needs to re-crunch these numbers.

JamieAnn
04-09-2010, 10:41 AM
He was basically saying that some do, and some do not. He was saying that when I was 16 and my doctor told me it might not progress, he wasn't technically wrong, because some do not.

However in my case as with many others, it did. I think it's something doctors simply do not know.

Pooka1
04-09-2010, 10:46 AM
He was basically saying that some do, and some do not. He was saying that when I was 16 and my doctor told me it might not progress, he wasn't technically wrong, because some do not.

However in my case as with many others, it did. I think it's something doctors simply do not know.

I may be out of the loop but I consider that a blockbuster statement.

Saying that some do and some don't starting from the low to mid 30s* is a SIGNIFICANT departure from the paradigm which I believe is, "It would be unusual or rare to progress to surgery, especially at a young age, starting from low to mid 30s* at maturity."

Huge change of thinking as far as I can tell. Kids and parents need to shoot for something far lower than the 30s* with braces if they want a real shot at avoiding surgery. If I had known that I never would have agreed to my daughter's brace.

rohrer01
04-09-2010, 10:51 AM
Hi,
I'm 41 years old. I had a stable curve my whole life until my 40's. I have always had pain with my curve. I was diagnosed at 16 years old with upper thoracic 39* curve. I was told I couldn't be braced and that I would probably need surgery in my 40's. Back then the "magical" number for surgery was 40* and now most doctors will say 50*. I am at 46*, like you, and in terrible pain. I am hoping to have surgery this year.

Something to think about. If you are having pain now and do not have children. Let me tell you that lifting those little woogies increases your pain, a LOT. Right now you don't have the responsibility of taking care of children. If you wait, you will not only have to take care of your own recovery, but your children, too.

My children are grown for the most part, so I don't have that to factor in. Best wishes in your decision.

JamieAnn
04-09-2010, 10:55 AM
Who is saying that it's rare? Is that from what you have read, or another doctor is saying that?

I'm an example of this, and clearly I'm not the only one. I think this is what's frustrating about scoliosis - is that there does not seem to be a clear answer.

debbei
04-09-2010, 11:22 AM
Hi Everyone,

It's been a while since I've been on the forum :). I just came from my appointment with Dr. Errico in NYC, and need some advice!

I used to see Dr. Schwab, also in NY, and had to switch this year due to my insurance changing. I've heard great things about both so I wanted the second opinion anyway.

My curve seems to be progressing at an average speed. It was in the low 30's when I was a teenager, now I'm 29 years old and it's around 46 degrees. Dr. Schwab had said a few years ago that it will probably continue to get worse, and today Dr. Errico said he would recommend surgery.

I really appreciated the time he took with me, but somehow I feel like there isn't enough time to spend talking about this surgery to feel comfortable. He was pretty laid back about the idea of surgery, kinda like it was no big deal. He was also very honest in saying that it's 100% my choice, and I can do this at any time but earlier is obviously better due to my age and flexbility of my spine.

Does anyone have any advice, being in a similar situation? Now that I've officially gotten a green light from a specialist, I feel like I really need to start thinking seriously about this and make some decisions. I feel like everyone else in my life doesn't get this at all - some think I'm being overly dramatic, some think I should run out and do this.

Help? :confused:

Thanks everyone,
Jamie

Hi Jamie,

your curve seems to be stable in the last 4 years. Are you having any pain? If I weren't having pain and the curve seemed stable, I'd think I'd hold off. In my case, like Jen, I believe (although who knows) that having my 3 kids made it progress more than anything. Maybe it would have progressed anyway? We're not fortune tellers :)

Good luck with your decision, I know it is a hard one to make.

JenM
04-09-2010, 01:15 PM
I just wanted to add in that I didn't have alot of pain before I had my kids. I had a little pain but it really didn't bother me at all. The pain started to get to me after I delivered them when I had to pick them up all the time. Both of my kids were in the 99% for both weight and height and it was such a challenge for me to get through the days. There were days I would just be in tears my back hurt so bad. During a child's first 2 years of life you have to pick them up all the time...they are so dependent on you. Like I mentioned in my earlier post, in the few years while I was pregnant with both of my kids my curve increased 10 degrees to it's current state of 58 degrees. So that's why I am getting the surgery in 8 weeks, because my kids will be 3 and 5 and I don't need to pick them up anymore. My back has become very deformed during the past few years and I am looking forward to having a more normal back! I feel like it's probably better to do the surgery now than wait 20 years. You recover much faster. I think my doctor, or a previous one that i had, said if you are 30 years old you recover more like a teen.

debbei
04-09-2010, 01:21 PM
I just wanted to add in that I didn't have alot of pain before I had my kids. I had a little pain but it really didn't bother me at all. The pain started to get to me after I delivered them when I had to pick them up all the time. Both of my kids were in the 99% for both weight and height and it was such a challenge for me to get through the days. There were days I would just be in tears my back hurt so bad. During a child's first 2 years of life you have to pick them up all the time...they are so dependent on you. Like I mentioned in my earlier post, in the few years while I was pregnant with both of my kids my curve increased 10 degrees to it's current state of 58 degrees. So that's why I am getting the surgery in 8 weeks, because my kids will be 3 and 5 and I don't need to pick them up anymore. My back has become very deformed during the past few years and I am looking forward to having a more normal back! I feel like it's probably better to do the surgery now than wait 20 years. You recover much faster. I think my doctor, or a previous one that i had, said if you are 30 years old you recover more like a teen.

Jen,
I just want to tell you that you don't 'appear' deformed. It's easy for us to see these deformities in ourselves, but not easy for normal people who have no idea.

You will be fine with your surgery, I just know it. You are doing the right thing.

JenM
04-09-2010, 01:26 PM
Ha, ha. Thanks Debbie. But that's because I wear really large shirts to hide my back!!! Ughhh, I'm counting down the weeks already. Scared to death, but I know I'm doing the right thing. The real anxiety will kick in on May 8, with 1 month to go!!

debbei
04-09-2010, 01:28 PM
Ha, ha. Thanks Debbie. But that's because I wear really large shirts to hide my back!!! Ughhh, I'm counting down the weeks already. Scared to death, but I know I'm doing the right thing. The real anxiety will kick in on May 8, with 1 month to go!!

No not true, I saw you with my own eyes. Honestly, you see it much more than anyone else. You do not appear hunched over or off balance. :)

Want to get together again before your surgery?

JamieAnn
04-09-2010, 01:34 PM
How is it that people really don't notice our crooked-ness? :) I have to admit it's a nice thing but it does drive you a little nuts sometimes when you start questioning yourself!

I find dressing room mirrors to be absolutely horrible - it must be the lighting but I always notice my curves moreso than ever there!

Thanks for the additional info Jen. I can see what you mean about your level of pain - that's how I would describe mine. My back is very achy all the time, walking through a mall is torture, theme parks are also torture, and commuting to work every day is not easy either. But I'm wondering if this is because I just need to work out more often and "suck up" the discomfort.

Either way, I can't stand the idea of this getting worse. So I'm already leaning towards the idea of getting this surgery "out of the way" as scary as this all is.

jrnyc
04-09-2010, 01:47 PM
Hi Jamie
i dont think your pain is because you need to work out or ignore the pain...pain caused by a curved spine is real pain...not the kind of minor aches people with straight backs and no disc problems describe..the achiness from walking...the tiredness from walking...is from insufficient support from the back....i find it exhausting! i can no longer walk my beloved NYC or stand at a bus stop...the last few years i worked (2 jobs) there i needed cabs to go everywhere! it was just too tiring and exhausting to take public transportation!! my 2nd paycheck ended up paying huge $$ totals for cabs!
if your curve went from 45 to 46 degress in 4 years...maybe the progression is slowing...?

best of luck
jess

JamieAnn
04-09-2010, 01:57 PM
Thanks, I'm beginning to understand that more and more, but I can't help but feeling I'm partially responsible.

As for the progression, 4 years ago they measured it at 45, 2 years ago 41, and this year 46. I know there is a degree of error, so I'm looking at it over the last 14 years from 32 - 46. That's 1 degree per year.

I suppose there is no way to prove at this point if it's stopping, but from everything I've heard it will keep getting worse once it's into the 40's.

Pooka1
04-09-2010, 02:14 PM
Who is saying that it's rare? Is that from what you have read, or another doctor is saying that?

It is from everything I have read, was told, and heard.

There is no point in wearing a brace in the 30s* if it is likely you will still progress to surgery as a young adult. Or at least I see no reason.

I think if you polled the parents on this site and the patients who were treated as children you would get a near 100% response that the surgeons are saying if they can make it to maturity in the low to mid 30s* they are almost certain to avoid progression requiring fusion in a normal lifespan. Near or actually 100% will say that as far as I can tell.

Pooka1
04-09-2010, 02:17 PM
There was a case of a woman whose curve was in the 30s IIRC correctly on another forum and that the surgeon was surprised she progressed to surgery as a young adult. It was on Dr. Hey's blog. That was viewed as a very unusual situation even then and that was last year. I'll try to find it.

JamieAnn
04-09-2010, 02:30 PM
do you think it makes a difference that I was 16, and not an adult? Maybe my body was still growing?

Pooka1
04-09-2010, 02:36 PM
do you think it makes a difference that I was 16, and not an adult? Maybe my body was still growing?

The master variable except in very oddball cases is 2 years post menarche.

As I understand it, it would be highly unusual for a wrist radiograph to not show maturity 2 years post menarche.

The next best thing, absent some very oddball condition, is chronological age. At 16, I think it is safe to say you were done or close to done growing.

I hope others weigh in on the issue. To a person I expect they will say that 30s* is almost certainly in the clear for life (though the issue of ancillary damage from even a 30* curve in the long run hasn't been studied).

Pooka1
04-09-2010, 02:50 PM
I forgot the specifics... her lumbar collapsed although she had a thoracic curve. I suspect that is HIGHLY unusual and is irrelevant to what we are discussing.

ETA: I also misremembered the year... I posted it last year but the blog entry is from 2007. The mind... so very fragile... :)

http://drlloydhey.blogspot.com/2007/09/29-yo-woman-with-progressive-scoliosis.html


Yesterday Jaclyn and I saw a lovely 29 yo woman at Hey Clinic who was diagnosed with a R thoracic scoliosis as a young teenager. The curve was followed with serial X-Rays, and by the time she turned 17 and had stopped growing, her thoracic curve was 30 degrees, and her lumbar compensatory curve was 18 or so degrees. At that time the patient remembers being told that “she did not need to worry” since she was “done growing” and her curve was not that large.

Since then, she did just great until about 2-3 years ago, when she noticed that her “hourglass” figure was beginning to shift, with her R hip becoming more prominent, and her trunk sitting too far over to left, and abdomen becoming slightly more protruberant on that L side. She has had some low back pain, slightly more in past year or two.

She came in to Clinic today with questions about getting pregnant and having children with her scoliosis.

Her X-Ray shown above shows that her thoracic curve was still around 30 degrees, but her lumbar curve was now approximately 39 degrees, with severe disc collapse especially at L23 level.
She was really surprised to see the degree of progression over the past 12 years.

Much more in the blog entry about many things including pregnancy.

JamieAnn
04-09-2010, 03:22 PM
Thanks, that's very interesting! That sounds a lot like my situation!

JenM
04-09-2010, 03:27 PM
Hi Pooka-

It's so funny you posted that link from Dr. Hey's website. I read his site every week and remember reading that story and it is sooo similar to my situation. When I was around 15 years old, I had a double curve, and my right thoracic curve was in the mid-30's and my lumbar curve was like 19 degrees. Then a few years later, my lumbar curve moved just to like 24 degrees. Well, now at 31 years old, my lumbar curve is 58 degrees and is larger than my thoracic curve (which is now 55 degrees)!! Something happened during my pregnancy (guess the extra weight - gained 50 pounds with each pregnancy) and I noticed my body started to look different. I was shocked when I found out in November that my lumbar was measuring more than my thoracic curve!!! THe doctors didn't recommend surgery to me when I was in my teens. THey didn't think my curve would progress.

Pooka1
04-09-2010, 03:28 PM
Thanks, that's very interesting! That sounds a lot like my situation!

Well but your T curve progressed and your lumbar didn't collapse!

There are plenty of interesting blog entries on Dr. Hey's site. He must hold the land speed record for surgeries... it seems he can do a given fusion is much less time than any other surgeon and rarely ever needs to transfuse a patient from the cases I read. He has an interesting personal history and seems driven.

Pooka1
04-09-2010, 03:31 PM
Hi Pooka-

It's so funny you posted that link from Dr. Hey's website. I read his site every week and remember reading that story and it is sooo similar to my situation. When I was around 15 years old, I had a double curve, and my right thoracic curve was in the mid-30's and my lumbar curve was like 19 degrees. Then a few years later, my lumbar curve moved just to like 24 degrees. Well, now at 31 years old, my lumbar curve is 58 degrees and is larger than my thoracic curve (which is now 55 degrees)!! Something happened during my pregnancy (guess the extra weight - gained 50 pounds with each pregnancy) and I noticed my body started to look different. I was shocked when I found out in November that my lumbar was measuring more than my thoracic curve!!! THe doctors didn't recommend surgery to me when I was in my teens. THey didn't think my curve would progress.

Wow now that is VERY much like the case Dr. Hey's case. Wow.

So you are yet another person who was mid 30s* at maturity and went into the surgical region as a young adult. This is not the paradigm.

ETA: DOH! I double counted you, JenM. You are the same person upthread. Sorry. :o

naptown78
04-09-2010, 09:17 PM
Jamie Ann,
Please make sure you get more than one opinion when considering surgery and also try more conservative techniques such as physical therapy and pain management. I say this because I am one of the few that had complications with my first surgery and had to have a revision 2 yrs later. Things don't always go as expected so if you don't have significant disability or pain, I would also hold off. Good luck in your research and ultimate decision!

debbei
04-10-2010, 06:56 AM
I've pointed out before that I was an exception too. When I stopped visiting the ortho at age 22 (after 3 teenage years in the brace), my curves were both about 30 degrees. I was told that I would never get any worse. Fast forward to 45 yrs old, and they were both 66 degrees.

Bottom line, in my opinion, is that it's not an exact science.

Pooka1
04-10-2010, 07:01 AM
I've pointed out before that I was an exception too. When I stopped visiting the ortho at age 22 (after 3 teenage years in the brace), my curves were both about 30 degrees. I was told that I would never get any worse. Fast forward to 45 yrs old, and they were both 66 degrees.

Bottom line, in my opinion, is that it's not an exact science.

Well it sounds like some doctors are not viewing this as particularly unusual any more. They must be seeing plenty of patients who were thought stable in the 30s* but still needed fusion pretty early.

I wonder if this will filter into the bracing strategies... does it make sense to put kids in the 30s* in a brace given a reassessed progression potential and given the rates of fusion for ancillary damage to the spine even in smaller curves?

You wore a brace 3 years. I think you said is was a Milwaukee, is that right? My kid only wore a night-time brace one year and I think that was a mistake for many reasons not just this potential new one.

debbei
04-10-2010, 07:16 AM
Well it sounds like some doctors are not viewing this as particularly unusual any more. They must be seeing plenty of patients who were thought stable in the 30s* but still needed fusion pretty early.

I wonder if this will filter into the bracing strategies... does it make sense to put kids in the 30s* in a brace given a reassessed progression potential and given the rates of fusion for ancillary damage to the spine even in smaller curves?

You wore a brace 3 years. I think you said is was a Milwaukee, is that right? My kid only wore a night-time brace one year and I think that was a mistake for many reasons not just this potential new one.

Yes it was the Milwaukee brace, 23 hrs a day. My youngest child, a girl, is almost 11 yrs old. She has a very slight curve. The the minute she starts to progress, we will jump on it immediately and brace her, due to my history. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that she doesn't and it doesn't come to that.

Nitram
04-10-2010, 07:02 PM
Both my wife and I have scoliosis so we are watching our kids very closely. We've already had my daughter (11) in to see my doctor as she showed sign of a minor curve. There is now a genetic test that can be done which can help the doctor get a feel for the chances of a curve progressing. The point of doing the test is to give the doctor as much advance notice as possible to start treatment early if needed...I reallydont want my kids to have to have the surgery I just had and anything I can do to try and prevent that is worth it to me. It's not an exact test but my doc says if you score at the extreme ends of the test indicating a very high, or very low chance of progression it's apprently pretty accurate. Of course my daughter scored in the middle which didn't really help the doc at all, but it gives us hope her very minor curve won't progress.

Rich

debbei
04-10-2010, 07:59 PM
Both my wife and I have scoliosis so we are watching our kids very closely. We've already had my daughter (11) in to see my doctor as she showed sign of a minor curve. There is now a genetic test that can be done which can help the doctor get a feel for the chances of a curve progressing. The point of doing the test is to give the doctor as much advance notice as possible to start treatment early if needed...I reallydont want my kids to have to have the surgery I just had and anything I can do to try and prevent that is worth it to me. It's not an exact test but my doc says if you score at the extreme ends of the test indicating a very high, or very low chance of progression it's apprently pretty accurate. Of course my daughter scored in the middle which didn't really help the doc at all, but it gives us hope her very minor curve won't progress.

Rich

As a matter of fact, my 11 yr old daughter had the genetic test almost 4 weeks ago. We are waiting for the results. I really wanted her to have the test, but from what the Dr. tells me, if the 'score' is within a certain (large) range, you don't know more than prior to having the test. I'll post when we get her results, which I hope to be next week.

Doodles
04-11-2010, 06:58 PM
I didn't know such a test existed. Three of my 4 girls have scoliosis slightly. The 4th is seeing more progression and is 22. Has anyone else used this test?
Janet

debbei
04-12-2010, 07:10 AM
I didn't know such a test existed. Three of my 4 girls have scoliosis slightly. The 4th is seeing more progression and is 22. Has anyone else used this test?
Janet

Here are the details:

http://www.axialbiotech.com/patients/learn/scolidx

JamieAnn
04-12-2010, 08:30 AM
Did anyone else participate in the test for this company a few years ago? I had to submit my saliva and some forms, and I believe this was what resulted from that test.

LindaRacine
04-12-2010, 03:08 PM
Did anyone else participate in the test for this company a few years ago? I had to submit my saliva and some forms, and I believe this was what resulted from that test.

I did. I think a lot of us did.

--Linda

Doodles
04-12-2010, 09:31 PM
Debbei--Thanks so much. Janet