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bas2101
02-06-2010, 10:53 AM
What is known in terms of Vitamin D deficiency and scoliosis? This is what I have found, but just wondering what any one else knows.

In a 2005 study: osteopenia is suggested as an important risk factor for curve progression. They found that 27% to 38 % of girls with idiopathic scoliosis also had osteopenia. Here is the title:Osteopenia: a new prognostic factor of curve progression in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

In a 2008 study, girls with scoliosis who progressed during brace treatment versus those who did not, had higher rates of osteopenia (along with other factors). The study concluded that "Osteopenia might be an independent risk factor in the curve progression during brace treatment." Here is the title: The role of initial bone mineral status in predicting the early outcome of brace treatment in girls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

In another 2008 study, it concluded "Low bone mineral status in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis" (this is also the title of the study, although it does not conclude whether or not which the causative factor).

Lastly, a 2003 study concluded: "Inadequate calcium intake is a significant determinant on generalised osteopenia in Hong Kong Chinese adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis." (also the title)

I found all of these studies (all done in China) on one particular website that was pondering the role of Vitamin D deficiency in scoliosis, since Vitamin D is a key factor in bone mineral density and calcium uptake. Regardless of the legitimacy of this website, all the studies can be found there: http://www.easy-immune-health.com/vitamin-d-and-scoliosis.html
(I have yet to read the entire studies, but looked at the abstracts).

Have any of you, adults or kids, been tested for osteopenia, osteoperosis, or Vitamin D? And, if osteopenia is indeed present in upwards of 38% of AIS, why are orthopedists not testing for it (at least the 4 we went to did not- no one has ever suggested it). My daughter has not been tested for osteopenia as of yet, but was just tested for Vitamin D and is deficient (19). I also understand that Vitamin D deficiency is higher in higher latitudes, as is the prevalence of scoliosis (while this could be related to other factors, I still find it curious).

Just wondering any one else's thoughts on all of this. Always looking for an answer.

Brooke

mamamax
02-06-2010, 11:59 AM
Hi Brooke - I've not been tested for vitamin D deficiency, but knowing that this vitamin requirement is very important for the very young, and for the aging - has found me doing some lay-research. Good find - your article.

Absorption of calcium, magnesium, and zink appears dependent upon D - which in turn seems dependent upon B12 - which is dependent upon B1, B6, and Folic Acid. At least that's how I think I remember my research. As a result I supplement with all these.

I'm currently trying to put together a better diet plan that would provide all these things in a more natural way - which has led me to some interesting discussions on genetic engineering of our food sources ;-)

The sunshine vitamin D - can we really get enough just from the sun? I don't know - especially nearing 70: http://www.berkeleywellness.com/html/wl/2003/wlFeatured0103.html

All supplements should be taken with caution - for example one can get too much D. Here's a pretty good in depth article:
http://www.merck.com/mmpe/sec01/ch004/ch004k.html

Important Note: If we choose to supplement our diets with vitamins - then it may be important to keep the family practitioner aware of this as many can have an effect on other prescription drugs. My family doctor has a program in his blackberry that can tell him how any one vitamin supplement may interact with a given prescription. A good example is vitamin K - it can't be used with blood thinners, and large amounts in natural forms (like collard greens) should be avoided (if one is on blood thinners), as my brother's doctor says anyway.

Looking forward to others who may weigh in on this.

Pooka1
02-06-2010, 08:13 PM
In a 2005 study: osteopenia is suggested as an important risk factor for curve progression. They found that 27% to 38% of girls with idiopathic scoliosis also had osteopenia.

Did only the girls with osteopenia progress?

If the progressive cases were all over the map then this is an incidental finding and not predictive of progression.

Pooka1
02-06-2010, 08:16 PM
In a 2008 study, girls with scoliosis who progressed during brace treatment versus those who did not, had higher rates of osteopenia (along with other factors). The study concluded that "Osteopenia might be an independent risk factor in the curve progression during brace treatment." Here is the title: The role of initial bone mineral status in predicting the early outcome of brace treatment in girls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

Marfans patients are also known to not respond to brace treatment. Any study that doesn't control for at least that and probably other connective tissue disorders is questionable at best.

Also, how did they control for the brace restricting movement and possible causing or contributing to osteopenia?

jrnyc
02-06-2010, 10:49 PM
vitamin D deficiency is quite common in older adults..especially where they are not out in the sun alot...like northeast in winter! that is according to my hormone doctor, who put me on vitamin D tablets...

i wonder...since lack of calcium can be a factor in osteopenia... i wonder if, since most calcium capsules come with "built in" vitamin D...i wonder if lack of calcium is related to lack of D which is related to oseopenia in many cases...??

i hope someone is making it clear to teen girls just how important calcium is ....& if they dont eat right ( i fear many teens do not)....that they take calcium supplements even at a young age!

i have osteopenia...surgeons have told me they can still do fusion surgery on me, should i/when i decide to go ahead with it....

note...hormone specialists are very good about testing for vitamin D...but it is not special, so any doctor can test for it if you ask them to! and bone densitiy is an important test for older females...younger ones too, if there is a question...


jess

Pooka1
02-07-2010, 09:01 AM
[COLOR="RoyalBlue"]vitamin D deficiency is quite common in older adults..especially where they are not out in the sun alot...like northeast in winter! that is according to my hormone doctor, who put me on vitamin D tablets...

i wonder...since lack of calcium can be a factor in osteopenia... i wonder if, since most calcium capsules come with "built in" vitamin D...i wonder if lack of calcium is related to lack of D which is related to oseopenia in many cases...??

I was listening to the doctor channel on satellite radio and they could not say enough about supplementing with Vitamin D. It's all upside.


i hope someone is making it clear to teen girls just how important calcium is ....& if they dont eat right ( i fear many teens do not)....that they take calcium supplements even at a young age!

Our pediatrician told my girls to take calcium supplements. They did is for a while. I just recently by coincidence got them some more and asked them to take them.


i have osteopenia...surgeons have told me they can still do fusion surgery on me, should i/when i decide to go ahead with it....

note...hormone specialists are very good about testing for vitamin D...but it is not special, so any doctor can test for it if you ask them to! and bone densitiy is an important test for older females...younger ones too, if there is a question...


I think osteoporosis at least has some hereditary component. For example, my mother's family at least seems to have significant bone and we have no known case of osteoporosis.

Good post, Jess

bas2101
02-07-2010, 09:57 AM
The 2008 study found that girls with progressive AIS had higher rates of osteopenia, among other factors. They are suggesting that osteopeina be added as 1 of 5 factors in progression prediction.

This is what they found: "All growth potential factors, curve-related factors, and the Z-score bone mineral density at the femoral neck on the convex-side hip and at all sites on the concave-side hip were significantly associated with curve progression (p < 0.05 for all). In contrast, the Z-score bone mineral density at the spine (chi square, p = 0.062), Z-score bone mineral density at the trochanter on the convex-side hip (chi square, p = 0.177), and a family history of scoliosis (chi square, p = 0.750) did not show a significant association with curve progression."

There is more to the study if anyone is interested.


I cannot access the bracing study, so I do not know if they factored in bracing as a causative/contributing factor to osteopenia. They are however also suggesting osteopenia be added as 1 of 5 factors in predicting whether or not an AIS patient will progress during bracing. These were the results:

RESULTS: There were 16 girls (21%) with a progressed scoliosis and 61 girls (79%) with a non-progressed scoliosis, respectively. In the girls with a progressed scoliosis, higher ratios of subjects were found with pre-menarchal status (chi(2) = 9.628, P = 0.004), lower Risser grade (chi(2) = 4.565, P = 0.037), main thoracic scoliosis (chi(2) = 4.009, P = 0.045), a larger curve (chi(2) = 1.685, P = 0.194), as well as osteopenia (chi(2) = 3.828, P = 0.050), as compared with those with a non-progressed scoliosis. During brace treatment, besides pre-menarchal status, a larger Cobb angle, and a main thoracic scoliosis, osteopenia (OR = 5.362, P = 0.022) was identified as the risk factor in curve progression in AIS girls, as revealed by the multiple Logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Osteopenia might be an independent risk factor in the curve progression during brace treatment. The analysis of initial BMD status before bracing may help to predict the outcome of brace treatment.

The 2007 Saudi Arabian study concluded that scoliosis causes osteopenia/osteoporosis in AIS patients compared to their siblings, although I don't understand how they determined it as causative rather than the result of osteopenia.

Pooka1
02-07-2010, 10:20 AM
The 2008 study found that girls with progressive AIS had higher rates of osteopenia, among other factors. They are suggesting that osteopeina be added as 1 of 5 factors in progression prediction.

This is what they found: "All growth potential factors, curve-related factors, and the Z-score bone mineral density at the femoral neck on the convex-side hip and at all sites on the concave-side hip were significantly associated with curve progression (p < 0.05 for all). In contrast, the Z-score bone mineral density at the spine (chi square, p = 0.062), Z-score bone mineral density at the trochanter on the convex-side hip (chi square, p = 0.177), and a family history of scoliosis (chi square, p = 0.750) did not show a significant association with curve progression."

Okay I have a general question about this study and studies like it. Did they do these measurements on girls who had progressed versus girls who still have smaller curves or did they do the measurements on all girls and note LATER that the ones who progressed had these particular bone scores?

This is a critical question in my opinion.

And all this smacks of the issue of just adding in terms that happen to increase the fit of a curve. That is, the other factors (Rissser, T versus L curve, chrono age, menstrual status, etc.) might explain 75% of the relationship but just by coincidence these other bone factors happen to increase the fit a few more percentage points. When you start getting up past 3 or 4 factors in something like this, it's very hard to say anything one way or anything as I understand this.


The 2007 Saudi Arabian study concluded that scoliosis causes osteopenia/osteoporosis in AIS patients compared to their siblings, although I don't understand how they determined it as causative rather than the result of osteopenia.

Good point.

bas2101
02-07-2010, 10:51 AM
It appears that they tested all the girls' bone density first, and then indicated who progressed later.

As far as it being just one more factor to consider in the mix, I am sure there are others that could pop up too. But, still, I wouldn't want to overlook its potential significance. And, if osteopenia/osteoporosis is a factor in AIS in upwards of 38% of patients, why is this not addressed in general, as in, why is there no attempt to treat it, or even to find out who has it and who doesn't? I certainly want to know if my daughter has it to prevent it from being a problem in the future-surgery or not.

Pooka1
02-07-2010, 11:07 AM
I suspect that if there is a very high correlation with more robust indicators like Risser, chrono age, mentrual status then it added nothign to the predictive power of who will progress.

As to whether it is treatable in children or whether it ever rises to an issue in surgery in children I don't know. May not be an issue. I would think if it was correlated with pseudoarthrosis or other complications it would be studied more. Maybe it will be but as I understand this, the state of the instrumentation is that 95% of kids will avoid pseudoarthrosis even WITHOUT physical restrictions in the post op period. If you restrict them all then the rate approaches zero. Given that, it doesn't seem like there is any room for osteopenia to be an issue at all in surgery in kids. Of course delaying surgery into adulthood it might become a major factor in pseudoarthrosis. Who knows.

skevimc
02-08-2010, 12:51 PM
I was considering posting a thread on vitamin D a couple of days ago.. Beat me to it. :)

The other component of vit D, which I did not realize until just recently, is that vit D plays an important role in muscle function as well. In fact, endorcrinologists call vit D "the other steroid". There is a vit D receptor on the muscle cell and on the nucleus of the muscle. It plays a very important role in calcium transport and cell metabolism.

The general incidence of vit D deficiency or 'insufficieny' (indicating low levels of D) is surprisingly common. And it's more common in female teens than male teens. It's correct that the higher latitudes have lower values, which also correlates with AIS incidence.

There are several correlations with Vit D and scoliosis. There are far too many people with low levels for it to be directly causative though. However, it's certainly not helping to stabilize the curve either. I'm interested in learning more about the muscle component of it and if there are any naturally occurring vit D receptor defects in any population (other than knockout mice). You take some osteopenic bone and some mildly dysfunctional muscles..... Hmmm

jrnyc
02-08-2010, 01:04 PM
ahhh well..too bad it isnt REALLY "the other steroid"...cause' then i could get vitamin D injections instead of steroid injections at the pain management doctor's office! :rolleyes:

jess

mamamax
02-08-2010, 02:04 PM
There are several correlations with Vit D and scoliosis. There are far too many people with low levels for it to be directly causative though. However, it's certainly not helping to stabilize the curve either. I'm interested in learning more about the muscle component of it and if there are any naturally occurring vit D receptor defects in any population (other than knockout mice). You take some osteopenic bone and some mildly dysfunctional muscles..... Hmmm

Aren't the B's and folic acid important to absorption of D? I can't remember. Agree that these things are not causative but that deficiencies certainly can't help.

Another component that affects muscle is emotion. While this is said to be well known - I hardly every hear anyone talk about it. Emotions also play a key role in hormonal changes - and possibly the body's ability to absorb nutrients.

I'll step aside now and allow my comments to be hammered ;-)

Pooka1
02-08-2010, 03:10 PM
I'll step aside now and allow my comments to be hammered ;-)

That was pretty good!

Life is complex.

skevimc
02-08-2010, 04:22 PM
Aren't the B's and folic acid important to absorption of D? I can't remember. Agree that these things are not causative but that deficiencies certainly can't help.

Another component that affects muscle is emotion. While this is said to be well known - I hardly every hear anyone talk about it. Emotions also play a key role in hormonal changes - and possibly the body's ability to absorb nutrients.

I'll step aside now and allow my comments to be hammered ;-)

No hammering from me. :)

I'm sure other vitamins, e.g. B vitamins, are necessary or important to proper absorption. But the things I've been reading on vit D deal specifically with strength and D levels and vit D receptors. For example giving D to different populations and measuring strength and lean mass. The results are pretty surprising although it's still very new information. Also there are some slight changes in the genetic receptor profile that are linked to decreased strength and muscle mass.

Emotions.... Indeed. When I'm at a conference going to different seminars, the rooms talking about surgery and drugs are always packed to the gills. I mosey over to the QOL and exercise seminars and you can generally sit anywhere you want. Medicine and bio-research so frequently over look that exercise is itself a very powerful drug. And actually to be fair, the general public forgets this as well.

mamamax
02-08-2010, 05:10 PM
No hammering from me. :)

I'm sure other vitamins, e.g. B vitamins, are necessary or important to proper absorption. But the things I've been reading on vit D deal specifically with strength and D levels and vit D receptors. For example giving D to different populations and measuring strength and lean mass. The results are pretty surprising although it's still very new information. Also there are some slight changes in the genetic receptor profile that are linked to decreased strength and muscle mass.

Emotions.... Indeed. When I'm at a conference going to different seminars, the rooms talking about surgery and drugs are always packed to the gills. I mosey over to the QOL and exercise seminars and you can generally sit anywhere you want. Medicine and bio-research so frequently over look that exercise is itself a very powerful drug. And actually to be fair, the general public forgets this as well.

Insightful comments - much food for thought. Thank you :)

mamamax
02-10-2010, 08:27 PM
Emotions.... Indeed. When I'm at a conference going to different seminars, the rooms talking about surgery and drugs are always packed to the gills. I mosey over to the QOL and exercise seminars and you can generally sit anywhere you want. Medicine and bio-research so frequently over look that exercise is itself a very powerful drug. And actually to be fair, the general public forgets this as well.

Thank you Kevin. If we could get the Surgeon General to state that exercise is a powerful drug, more of us would be healthier. Seriously, it is true - or so my very exercise minded daughter tells me.

In all of your travels - did you ever come across the work of David Berceli? I've been reading about his work in Trauma Release Exercise.

Pooka1
02-10-2010, 09:13 PM
If we could get the Surgeon General to state that exercise is a powerful drug, more of us would be healthier.

Just hearing the surgeon general say that would make us healthier? I doubt a single person would start exercising after simply having heard that.

If it was easy we would all be fit.

mamamax
02-10-2010, 09:32 PM
Sharon -Do you ever tire of hammering every single thought I express? I think it is your exercise :D

Pooka1
02-10-2010, 09:37 PM
Sharon -Do you ever tire of hammering every single thought I express? I think it is your exercise :D

Pretty much. That and marveling at the amazing things some socialists say. :cool:

Some posts and threads I don't read. Your posts I read. A double edged sword? :D

hdugger
02-10-2010, 09:52 PM
Pretty much. That and marveling at the amazing things some socialists say. :cool:

Oh, hey! I heard that!

BTW, I believe the official term is "stinkin' pinko" :)

mamamax
02-11-2010, 05:37 AM
hmmmm ......

Processing :)

mamamax
02-11-2010, 05:47 AM
Medicine and bio-research so frequently over look that exercise is itself a very powerful drug. And actually to be fair, the general public forgets this as well.

Kevin -

In all of your travels - did you ever come across the work of David Berceli? I've been reading about his work in Trauma Release Exercise and find it fascinating.

Pooka1
02-11-2010, 06:50 AM
Oh, hey! I heard that!

BTW, I believe the official term is "stinkin' pinko" :)

Actually, socialism is a defensible position in my opinion.

Where socialists leave the tracks in when they take devil's advocate arguments to patently ridiculous extremes and end up appearing to defend nonsense "science" just because it appeals to the unwashed masses.

:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D

I got an error previewing this post... too many images)

skevimc
02-11-2010, 12:50 PM
Thank you Kevin. If we could get the Surgeon General to state that exercise is a powerful drug, more of us would be healthier. Seriously, it is true - or so my very exercise minded daughter tells me.


There's a great picture taken at the ACSM conference (American College of Sports Medicine). It was a pseudo-experiment done on the 'leaders' in exercise research. They took a sign or a cone or something (it's been a while since I've seen the picture. I'll see if I can find it.) and put it in front of the escalator implying that it was broken. The stairs were right next to it. (You know at conference centers where the escalators are on the sides and a double row of stairs runs down the middle). Anyway, it was a short flight of stairs. The picture shows that people walked around the cones and took the escalator instead of the 10 or 15 stairs. Like I said, this was at the ACSM conference. So it's even impossible to get the scientists who show how beneficial exercise is to exercise.

Then you get knuckle-heads who write articles like this (http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1914857,00.html). Taking studies and twisting their findings to create a headline that will sell magazines. I excuse the public for not knowing what to believe.


[COLOR="Navy"]
In all of your travels - did you ever come across the work of David Berceli? I've been reading about his work in Trauma Release Exercise.

I haven't come across him that I know of. Looking briefly at his stuff, it does look pretty interesting. The more I study the more I'm amazed at how beneficial exercise is. Our bodies are made to move and keep moving. We're not made to be sedentary.

mamamax
02-11-2010, 08:22 PM
There's a great picture taken at the ACSM conference (American College of Sports Medicine). It was a pseudo-experiment done on the 'leaders' in exercise research. They took a sign or a cone or something (it's been a while since I've seen the picture. I'll see if I can find it.) and put it in front of the escalator implying that it was broken. The stairs were right next to it. (You know at conference centers where the escalators are on the sides and a double row of stairs runs down the middle). Anyway, it was a short flight of stairs. The picture shows that people walked around the cones and took the escalator instead of the 10 or 15 stairs. Like I said, this was at the ACSM conference. So it's even impossible to get the scientists who show how beneficial exercise is to exercise.

Reminds me of who you find in the outside smoking sections of major hospitals - the respiratory therapists!


I haven't come across him that I know of. Looking briefly at his stuff, it does look pretty interesting. The more I study the more I'm amazed at how beneficial exercise is. Our bodies are made to move and keep moving. We're not made to be sedentary.

Looks like his focus is on the fight/flight psoas muscle - along with the theory that trauma is held (and accumulated) within the body. Lots of articles seem to indicate that this particular muscle can play hell with the pelvis area, lumbar spine and shoulders - pulling them out of alignment. I'm kind of surprised we don't hear much about this from our medical doctors - certainly could be something to consider with my curvature pattern. Martha Hawes had many sessions with a reflexologist to address just that (the psoas muscle), and in her memoir states that she believes that worked to pave the way for future changes for the better. Berceli's exercises remind me a lot of reflexology but they can be done without assistance and are non invasive. Liz Koch endorses his method and she seems to be the expert in that field. I'm going to work with them awhile and see how it goes.

kemery1
09-17-2011, 10:08 AM
I'm 55, severe scoliosis, and my dr just told me I'm vit D deficient. I started 2000 IU 3 times a week. will be checking to see if this helps... I do have osteopenia in the higher hip. will keep an eye on it. didn't realize it goes hand in hand with scoliosis... thanks!

LindaRacine
09-18-2011, 03:54 PM
There was a paper presented yesterday at the SRS annual meeting titled "Preoperative Vitamin D Deficiency in Adults Undergoing Spinal Deformity Surgery". They state that "The mean vitamin D level was 31.7 +13.3 ng/mL. Of 83 patients, 54% were vitamin D inadequate (<32 ng/mL) and 18% were deficient (<20).

mabeckoff
09-18-2011, 04:06 PM
I had low Vitamin D. Taking supplements now and have normal numbers

LSKOCH5
11-05-2011, 08:42 AM
This thread caught my eye as our son was just diagnosed w scoliosis (49% now 56%) and vitamin D deficiency. Surprise on both, as he downs 3 bowls of cereal w soy milk each day and plays outside several days a week. I'd like to see more studies on this.

Pooka1
11-05-2011, 09:12 AM
Vitamin D deficiency is fairly widespread whereas high-angle scoliosis is exquisitely rare in the general population. I heard a radio program on this a while ago about how deficient many people are for this vitamin. It was interesting enough to have the whole show on it.

My daughters had surgical level scoliosis and do not have a vitamin D deficiency. I do not have scoliosis and was put on a massive prescription dose for several weeks in order to get to a point where we can ramp it down to just one non-prescription dose a day.

I have never read of anyone suggest a relationship between the two but that doesn't rule it out. Sometimes folk just have more than one condition. They don't always have to be connected or part of the same underlying condition, even for something like Vitamin D that does play a part in bone metabolism if I recall correctly.

rohrer01
11-11-2011, 01:36 AM
I just found this thread as I was searching vitamin D deficiency. Low and behold our beloved forum popped up on my browser when I combined scoliosis and vitamin D. I was just diagnosed with extremely low vitamin D levels. One article that I read in WebMd (I think) said it was related to bone pain. It makes me wonder if that isn't where some of my pain is coming from. My levels were only 12, ouch! They are putting me on 50,000 unit pills once a week for 16 weeks before my recheck. That seems like an aweful lot. Has anyone else had a similar experience? Pooka, I seem to recall that you mentioned being treated for this. Did they give you that much for that long? Has anyone else heard of it being related to bone pain? I was tested by someone I saw for my migraine headaches. She also put me on lamictal. As far as I know that drug is used for epilepsy and bipolar disorder. I asked the pharmacist if he had ever heard of it being used for migraines and he said yes. I get different types of headaches that have always been attributed to my high and tight left thoracic curve, but now I'm wondering. Why don't scoli docs test for this, especially when people are in pain? Sorry for so many questions, but this is all new to me. Thanks in advance!

Oh, and I'm thinking about calling my PCP and letting him know to see if I should get a bone density test. What do you all think?

Pooka1
11-11-2011, 07:17 AM
I am on the same... 50K units per week for 16 weeks.

Mine was low but they didn't tell me the number. I will find out. I was told that some people are lower and are put on larger doses than what we are on, I think she said 100K units per week for many weeks or maybe more.

I can't say I have bone pain apart from normal aging pain. I don't get sore from riding several times a week which is really all that matters.

rohrer01
11-11-2011, 08:20 AM
I rode a horse for the first time in my life while on vacation in Arizona back in September. My sister has horses and my neice rides competively and for show. She was featured for about a half hour on the news! Anyway, she gave me a quick lesson, and I LOVED it. After a few minutes, I was riding by myself and it was AWESOME. Granted, the horse never got beyond a slow trot because we were in the round pen, but I didn't suffer any ill consequences from it. But on the topic of vitamin D, I do have bone pain in my spine that is quite severe at times. I was "hoping" that would subside with this treatment, but only time will tell. With my luck, I'll end up with kidney stones from it as they do run in my family...:-( Thanks, Sharon, for posting your experience with this.

Pooka1
11-11-2011, 12:38 PM
Don't give up quite yet on the vitamin D helping with bone pain. It may take a while to build up. For example, I will not be retested until the 12 week mark to see what the therapeutic dose has done. Once it is in normal range, I am to go on a daily Vitamin D supplement the rest of my life as I understand this.

Glad you liked riding! Some people like it and some are "bitten" and become obsessed. I am in the latter category. My two girls are in the former category despite many, many lessons. It is wildly more fun the more you can do. I presently have a very talented, very well trained horse. Also, I was smitten with rehab training for horses when I was able to help rehab my horse. It's very rewarding to be able to help a large animal like a horse use PT essentially to get stronger and more even. And to see the and feel the improvement over time.

Do you think you will do more riding?

rohrer01
11-11-2011, 04:55 PM
Don't give up quite yet on the vitamin D helping with bone pain. It may take a while to build up. For example, I will not be retested until the 12 week mark to see what the therapeutic dose has done. Once it is in normal range, I am to go on a daily Vitamin D supplement the rest of my life as I understand this.

Glad you liked riding! Some people like it and some are "bitten" and become obsessed. I am in the latter category. My two girls are in the former category despite many, many lessons. It is wildly more fun the more you can do. I presently have a very talented, very well trained horse. Also, I was smitten with rehab training for horses when I was able to help rehab my horse. It's very rewarding to be able to help a large animal like a horse use PT essentially to get stronger and more even. And to see the and feel the improvement over time.

Do you think you will do more riding?

As for the bone pain, I'm not giving up. I won't be rechecked until the 16 week mark.

As for horses, if I could convince my hubby to move out into the country I would LOVE to have one, but only if it is as tame as the one my neice has. My sister has some horses that started out really mean and my brother-in-law got hurt pretty bad a couple of times. Of course, I was there to witness it, so that intimidates me a little. But the riding came so natural. I've heard horror stories of how bumpy it is and everyone was worried about my back with me getting on, but I insisted. You just move with and feel like you become part of the animal. I loved it! I would definitely to it again.

LindaRacine
06-12-2012, 04:56 PM
I guess we all need to get our calcium needs met in our diets:

http://www.news-press.com/article/20120612/HEALTH/120612010/Panel-advises-against-Vitamin-D-calcium-supplements

rohrer01
06-12-2012, 06:22 PM
My vitamin D levels did come up into the "normal" range after 16 weeks but wasn't high enough for my practitioner's liking. I still take 5,000 IU every day. I also take calcium supplements.